Facebook or Fasaadbook?

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Social media is a great way to promote and propagate our beloved Deen – Alhumdu Lillah. But at the same time it’s important we are practising what we preach on social media. Or at least have the intention to practise upon it.
Brothers and sisters, it is very easy to copy and paste Hadith. This doesn’t make you a scholar or holier than other people. Nowadays, the problem is you can’t even correct anyone. We get fired with missiles of: ‘don’t judge me’. I guess this is Shaytan’s new plot/deception.
The second issue we have is ‘likes’ and ‘followers’. Before you post, ask yourself, brothers and sisters, are we posting for the sake of Allah SWT?
For His pleasure?
To promote His Deen?
Or is it just to get 200 likes and 1,000 extra followers. I’m not hesitant to say this, sadly scholars have fallen prey to this. Judgemental again? We judge people from the way they talk and the words that come out of their mouths. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that.
For those who think they’re accepted in Allah’s eyes because of excessive  “followers”….think again.  We have become consumed by this fame culture and overpowered by the, what I would call, neediness of likes and followers. Is it insecurity from within us? Or is it just a downright crave and love of oneself?
Even Dajjal will have 70,000 followers:
The Prophet SAW said, “70,000 Jews from Isfahan will follow the Dajjal.” (Muslim)
Still think you’re popular?
(Mawlana) Ismail ibn Nazir Satia (On who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure).
1 Shaban 1438

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The Loss of Conversation

Sister Fazila Bux, 1st Ethical CT/

May 21, 2012
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We live in an age where we are all ‘connected’. The phenomenon of the World Wide Web, manifested in Facebook, social networking sites, phone apps, and so forth seem to offer us endless and ever easier ways of keeping in constant touch with each other. In spite of this, many sociologists are finding our quality and quantity of conversation is actually poorer than a few years ago.
Why the paradox? Typing a smiley emoticon in a text message is certainly not the same as witnessing a real facial expression. Teens today are so engrossed in their online worlds, that they are simply not picking up the art of verbal conversation, which was a rite of passage even a mere decade ago. Even in workplaces, staff are less focused in meetings, reflexively checking phones and emails.
It is worth considering what the art of language represents, for we may be unwittingly degrading one of our most important qualities. Human beings are defined as “al-haywan al-natiq ” meaning we are the ‘talking animal’. The word for ‘talking’ in Arabic shares the same root as the word for ‘logic’ given speech is intrinsically linked with intellect, and this ability to externalise our intellect by meaningful sounds is the key factor differentiating us from animals.
Speech, and its corollary, the written word, therefore are gifts bestowed upon us by our Creator. The mightiest of gifts, the Quran, whose wisdom and depth transcend the limits of human intellect, was transmitted orally. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was known for his eloquence and brevity of speech: the ability to say a few words strung in a manner that conveyed vast meaning.
Limiting the art of conversation to only its online forms is not only depriving us of the irreplaceable warmth and depth of a face-to-face conversation, but is also depriving us of the ability to contemplate and reflect.
As Muslims we believe we can draw closer to God through pondering on His signs, both His word and His creation. To be less able to recognise these signs is therefore calamitous. Indeed the Qur’an states: “In the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the alternation of night and day, there are signs for people of intelligence” (Qur’an 3:190) .
Constantly being online makes it difficult to concentrate on anything, never mind contemplate.
Conversation is an art, and effective speech is a Prophetic trait to aspire towards.
In today’s world, properly conversing with our loved ones, and reflecting on life is something which no longer happens automatically but which needs proactive planning and effort. The sooner we realise this, the sooner we put a stop to a subtle degradation of our humanity.

Umar bin Al-Khattab (Allah be pleased with him), the second caliph and Companion of the Prophet (peace be upon him) once said that if it were not for three pleasures, he would not find any joy in life.

One of these three pleasures was “sitting in the company of men who like to pick good topics for conversation just as people like to pick good dates from a tree.”