Seerah Poem Competition

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

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I gave my class a competition when they finished their Seerah book, to write the summary of the Seerah in a poetic form. Here are the winners! Alhumdu Lillah…

He was born in the year when Abraha brought his elephants,

And it was the year Allah showed his benevolence.

Never knowing his father, his life was hard to fix,

But sadly, his mother also died when he was at the age of 6.

Now in the hands of Abdul Muttalib his life looked to be great,

It was a shame that this honoured man died when the Prophet SAW was only 8.

From then on, his uncle Abu Talib held the responsibility of his life,

And when the Prophet SAW was 25, Khadijah RA was to be his first wife.

With Khadijah RA, 2 boys and 4 girls he had,

A happy family they were and he was glad.

Gaining Prophethood at the age of of 40, he had an Ummah to make,

To serve Allah, he made it an opportunity that he would proudly take.

When it came to his wives, he had eleven,

And in one sitting he granted ten Sahabah RA Heaven.

From Makkah to Madinah he migrated with his Sahabah RA,

But he returned to do Hajj and do Tawaf of the Ka’bah.

Together they fought in in many battles for the sake of their Lord,

Passionately calling ‘Allahu Akbar’ as they up lifted up their swords.

At the age of 63, the Prophet Muhammad SAW sadly passed away,

However, the religion of Islam has lived on to this day.

 

Uwaiz Ebrahim Bahadur, 15 years old.

1st position.

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When the truth was lost and hearts were locked,

Allah sent a Prophet to guide hearts which were lost.

The blessed Muhammad was born in Makkah.

 

He was sent to teach right from wrong,

To worship nobody besides Allah, who is the only one.

 

His Sunnah guided people who were astray,

It gave them a way of life, telling them how to behave.

 

The Prophet SAW told us Paradise or Hell,

To follow the Qur’an and act upon what is said.

 

He loved nobody more than his final Ummah,

Even as he lay on his deathbed he cried for his followers.

 

The moment he left this world,

He left 3 men in charge to ensure the beauty,

Of Islam reached everyone’s hearts.

Zubair Iqbal Patel, 18 years old.

2nd position.

 

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About the Prophet Muhammad’s SAW Life

In the year 570 a special boy was born,

His name was Muhammad and deserved to take the throne.

 

He was born in Makkah where the beautiful Ka’bah was built by his beloved ancestors Ibraheem AS and Ismaeel AS,

The unfortunate demise of the Prophet’s father Abullah RA took place two months before he was born.

 

His mother Aminah RA sent him to Halimah Sadiyah to be nursed and be brought up by her,

After the 4 years he spend in the tribe of Saad, his respected mother passed away.

 

He then went to live with his courageous grandfather Abdul Muttalib, whose soul went after 2 years,

It was now the blessed Abu Talib’s turn, it was from him that the Prophet SAW started to learn.

 

The Prophet SAW was now 25 and he travelled to Syria at the request of Khadijah RA,

He then married her and had six children – 2 boys and 4 girls.

 

The 2 sons Abdullah and Qasim died when they were infants,

This was a tragic moment for him SAW,

And how can we forget his adopted son Zayd ibn Harithah RA?

 

His daughters, Zaynab, Ruqayyah, Umme Kulthum and Fatimah RA,

Two were married to Uthman RA and one to Ali RA.

 

As time went by, Islam grew and the Muslims had enemies,

They fought in wars like Badr where there were fewer than 400 men,

But the Makkans had more than 1,000 as enemy.

 

Islam spread far when the Prophet SAW became old, by 63

He was leading Maghrib Salah and could not continue, so told Abu Bakr to carry on.

 

This was an indication, to the next leader after him SAW,

Who was known as al-Siddique, the most truthful after him SAW.

 

Adam Irfan Mohammed, 11 years old.

2nd position

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A Poem About The Prophet Muhammad SAW

He was born in the Year of the Elephant,

The Year of the Elephant is called Aamul Feel.

 

The Prophet SAW was cared by Halima RA, but when it was time to go,

Halima RA wanted him to stay some more.

 

When he returned, at age 6 his mother passed away,

This was a time of very tough days.

 

Then came along his beloved grandad Abdul Muttalib, who took him in his care,

His grandad was very just and very fair.

 

At the age of 25 he got married to a lady called Khadijah RA,

And later, in total he had 11 wives.

 

At the age of 40 he got Prophethood,

In Makkah there was a lot of evil and not much good.

 

He SAW became a Prophet, the last Prophet of Allah,

This Prophet made Islam reach very very far!

Abdullah Faizal Kalu, 9 years old.

3rd position.

 

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Ramadān: The Month of Generosity


19th Ramadān 1437 AH ~ Friday 24th June 2016

By Hadrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

Spending one’s wealth for the cause of Allāh ta‘ālā is a very important aspect of Dīn and holds great rewards. Allāh ta‘ālā says:

The example of those who spend their wealth in the way of Allāh is like a grain that grows seven ears, each ear having a hundred grains. And Allāh multiplies [the reward further] for whom He wills. Allāh is All-Embracing, All-Knowing. (2:261)

Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam said:

The servants [of Allāh ta‘ālā] do not rise any morning except that two angels descend. One of them says, ‘O Allāh, give more to the one who spends [in the cause of Allāh ta‘ālā],’ and the other says, ‘O Allāh, bring ruin to the one who withholds.’ (Al-Bukhārī)

Indeed, sadaqah extinguishes the Wrath of Ar-Rabb, and prevents an unpleasant death. (At-Tirmidhī)

Sadaqah does not decrease wealth. (Muslim)

Allāh says, ‘O son of Ādam, spend; I will spend on you.’ (Al-Bukhārī)

The month of Ramadān is a month of generosity. Spending for the cause of Allāhta‘ālā, just like other good deeds, increases greatly in reward during this blessed month. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam, who was the most generous of people, was even more generous during the month of Ramadān. Ibn ‘Abbās t says:

The Messenger of Allāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam was the most generous of people, and he was the most generous in the month of Ramadān, when Jibra’īl‘alayhis salām would visit him. He would visit every night in Ramadān and revise the Qur’an with Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam. Indeed, Rasūlullāhsallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam was more generous than the [swift] blowing wind [that brings rain]. (Al-Bukhārī)

We should try our utmost to emulate our beloved Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallamby being as generous as possible in this blessed month. The percentage we spend for Allāh ta‘ālā during Ramadān should be greater than the percentage outside of Ramadān. We should spend as much voluntary charity in good causes as we can, at the same time ensuring there is no negligence as far as the obligatory duty of zakāh is concerned.

The consequences of withholding zakāh are indeed severe:

And those who hoard their gold and silver and spend it not in the way of Allāh, announce unto them a painful punishment. On the Day when it will be heated in the Fire of Jahannam and with it will be branded their foreheads, their flanks and their backs. [It will be said to them,] ‘This is what you hoarded for yourselves. Now taste of what you used to hoard.’ (9:34-35)

Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam said:

He who, despite being given wealth by Allāh, does not discharge his zakāh, his wealth will be made into a poisonous, bald-headed snake with two black spots over its eyes. It will coil itself around his neck on the Day of Qiyāmah and then bite his cheeks and say, ‘I am your wealth! I am your treasure!’ (Al-Bukhārī)

The following advice should be kept in mind when assessing one’s compliance with the rules of zakāh:

1. Fix a date when zakāh is to be calculated. The date is governed by when an individual reached the nisāb of zakāh and must be according to the Islamic Calendar. It must be a set date and not just estimated, as that would mean leaving the obligation of zakāh unfulfilled. Take the example of someone who calculated his zakāh on the 1st of Ramadān last year. This year he has £10,000 on the 1st Ramadān but the day ends without him calculating his zakāh. The next day, the 2nd Ramadān, he spends £5,000, and then on the 3rd Ramadān he finally sits down and calculates his zakāh. In this example he should have paid zakāh on £10,000, but due to not fixing a date he paid only on £5,000, half of what he owed.

2. Just as it is important to give zakāh at the right time, it is also important to calculate it correctly. Some people give a bit here and a bit there and assume they have given enough, when in fact they have fallen short of their obligation. It is essential therefore to learn from authentic ‘ulamā how to set a date and calculate zakāh properly.

Many people give their zakāh in Ramadān and feel they are gaining all the rewards of generosity that the month promises, but they overlook voluntary spending completely or to a large extent. Zakāh and voluntary spending are separate a‘māl in Islam and each should be given due attention. If we give a portion of zakāh to a project to help orphans, we should give some voluntary charity as well. And just as we should look for the most appropriate and rewarding recipients to give our zakāh to, we should also look for the most rewarding places to spend voluntarily. Indeed, the types of recipients of zakāh are limited, as prescribed by the Sharī‘ah, but the avenues where we can spend voluntarily are numerous.

In the Month of Generosity the rewards of voluntary deeds are elevated to the value of obligatory deeds, so voluntary spending should be a major part of our a‘māl. And not just during Ramadān; during every auspicious occasion e.g. 15th night of Sha‘bān, day of ‘Arafah, Laylat-ul-Qadr etc., spending in the cause of Allāh ta‘ālā should be part and parcel of our extra ‘ibādah. One step further, voluntary spending, within one’s means, should be made a routine throughout the year and should be budgeted for accordingly.

Finally, we should make a special point of spending in the nights of Ramadān. Although every moment of Ramadān is special, there is a particularly special night, Laylat-ul-Qadr, which will greatly multiply the reward for spending. If we spend £10 on Laylat-ul-Qadr, we will be rewarded as if we had made a £10 donation every night for over eighty-three years, for the reward of good deeds on that night is better than a thousand months (83 years and 4 months).

Some ‘ulamā say that Laylat-ul-Qadr occurs in the last ten nights of Ramadān, while others are of the opinion that it can fall on any night of Ramadān. As we do not know which night it will be, we should spend in the cause of Allāh ta‘ālā every night of Ramadān to avoid being deprived of the great rewards.

May Allāh ta‘ālā fill our hearts with true generosity, and may He grant us the tawfīq to follow in the footsteps of our beloved Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam and be even more generous this Ramadān. Āmīn.

© Riyādul Jannah (Vol. 21 No. 6, Jun 2012)


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Love and Reverence for the Prophet Sallallāhu ‘Alayhi Wasallam

by Shaykh Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

Whenever the blessed name of our beloved Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam is mentioned, the one who is fortunate to utter this name and also the one who is fortunate to hear his name should, with utmost love and reverence, say, ‘sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.’ Nowadays, there is great negligence amongst youth in this regard. Some years ago, with the now older generation, we would see such great love and enthusiasm in reciting salāh ‘alan nabī (durūd); whenever the following verse would be recited in the khuṭbah, everyone would read some formula of salāh ‘alan nabī:


Truly, Allāh and His angels send blessings upon the Prophet; O you who believe! Send salutations and abundant greetings upon him (too). (33:56)

This verse contains a command from Allāh ta‘ālā to send salāh ‘alan nabī as this is an action performed by both Allāh and His angels. However, for the youth nowadays this verse doesn’t bring any response. When it is recited we do not see anyone reading salāh ‘alan nabī audibly or even silently.

The ‘Ulamā have deduced from this verse that it is fard (compulsory) to send salutations and greetings upon the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam at least once in a lifetime. Thereafter, whenever one participates in any gathering, be it a dars (lesson) on the Qur’ān or ahādīth, a lecture or even an informal gathering, then the first time the blessed name of the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam is mentioned it is wājib (obligatory) to read salāh ‘alan nabī; thereafter, every time, in the same gathering, whenever the blessed name is mentioned it is mustaḥab (desirable) to read salāh ‘alan nabī each time.

What Love Dictates

Remember, love and reverence for the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam dictates that even if the sharī‘ah had not stipulated that salāh ‘alan nabī be read when his blessed name is mentioned, we would still send salutations and greetings upon him in abundance.

So, whenever we hear the verse above read in a khutbah, we should read salāh ‘alan nabī. There are many formulae for salāh ‘alan nabī. The most virtuous is the formula that we read in salāh. The shortest formula is ‘sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam’. This is the formula commonly used by the Muhaddithūn and is probably the most frequently recited form.

Our love for the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam should be such that we should not think of it to be a burden; rather, we should be eager to read it whenever we can. If, during a lecture, the scholar is explaining a point and happens not to mention the name of the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam for some time, we should feel that something is missing and eagerly await the mentioning of the blessed name so that we can say salāh ‘alan nabī.

Love and reverence for the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam also dictates that we do not shorten his name when writing it. Many, instead of writing ‘Muḥammad’ in full, suffice with writing ‘Mohd’. We write an article or letter of many pages and the only word that we find that we can shorten is the blessed name of the beloved of Allāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam! Similarly, many do not write, for example, ‘sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam’, sufficing with ‘s.a.w’. Again, in the whole letter, article, etc. are these the only words that we can find to shorten? There is a similar trend in the Urdu language where the letters ‘Sād’ or ‘Sād, Lām, ‘Ayn and Mīm’ are used to represent ‘sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam’. Ponder for a while that who is planting these thoughts in your mind about shortening the name and salutation for our beloved Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam. What does this show regarding our love and reverence for our beloved Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam?

Writing the Durūd

I remember when I was a student in Dār-al-‘Ulūm, the way we were taught by our elders and the culture in the Madrāsah was such that as the blessed name of the Prophet Sallallāhu ‘Alayhi Wasallam was mentioned again and again, it was very difficult to take down all the notes from the lectures and also write the name of the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam with salutations. Therefore, in our notes, wherever we had to write the blessed name of the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam and salutations, we would leave out a blank space and after class, in our own time, with our best handwriting we would write the salutations in our note books.

I would also like to bring an important point to the attention of many lecturers, who speak with the most eloquent language and accents, yet, when it comes to salāh ‘alan nabī they quickly mumble the words, void of love and reverence. Is this the level of our love and reverence for our Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam?

Nothing but Benefit

In reading salāh ‘alan nabī there is nothing but benefit for us:

1.     Allāh ta‘ālā sends ten mercies upon a person who recites salāh ‘alan nabī once.

2.     Ten sins are forgiven.

3.     The person’s rank is raised by ten degrees.

4.     Ten rewards are written for him.

5.     There is acceptance of du‘ā where salāh ‘alan nabī is recited at the beginning and at the end.

6.     The person will be blessed with the intercession of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.

7.     Allāh will forgive his sins.

8.     Allāh is pleased with him.

9.     The person will be nearer to the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam on the Day of Judgement.

10.   The person will have all his worries removed in this world and the Hereafter.

The great luminary in the field of tazkiyah and ihsān, Shaykh-al-Hadīth, Shaykh, Mawlānā Muhammad Zakariyyā rahimahullāh would often receive letters regarding different problems, and he would reply with appropriate answers. However, one point he would emphasise on in every reply was to be punctual in the recitation of salāh ‘alan nabī.

“There is a solution to every problem in sending salutations upon Muhammad sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.

Daily Practice

Finally, the great shaykh, Shaykh Mawlānā Rashīd Aḥmad Gangohī rahimahullāh would instruct that salāh ‘alan nabī be read a minimum of 300 times daily by every Muslim. In the beginning, we could read the shortest formula of salāh ‘alan nabī mentioned above. After that we should try to recite salāh ‘alan nabī with the most virtuous salāh ‘alan nabī mixed in after every 10-15 of the shortest formula. This figure of 300 should be increased on the day of Friday, as the day of Friday has a special affinity with the Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.

May Allāh ta‘ālā enable us to read salāh ‘alan nabī in abundance and have true love and reverence for our beloved Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.

Making the Sunnah a Part of Life: a Three Point Plan

By Hadrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

Importance of Sunnah

Allāh ta‘ālā has commanded us to follow and emulate the life of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam in the Glorious Qur’ān:

Say (O Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam): If you really love Allāh, then follow me, and Allāh shall love you and forgive you your sins. Allāh is Most-Forgiving, Very-Merciful. (3:31)

Similarly this has been emphasised by Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam in numerous ahādīth:

Hold fast to Kitābullāh and my Sunnah… (Al-Hākim)

Indeed adopting the ways of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam is the key to our success in both worlds. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has stated: 

Whoever loves my sunnah, loves me, and whoever loves me will be with me in Jannah. (Mishkāt) 

Regarding the importance of the Sunnah, Imām Mālik rahimahullāh has commented,“The Sunnah is like the Ark of Nūh ‘alayhis salām; whoever boards it will gain salvation and whoever stays aloof from it will drown.” (Tarīkh Dimashq)

Making Sunnah an Objective

In order to emulate the beautiful way of our beloved Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam in every aspect of our lives, first and foremost we must make this a conscious objective. Without making this an objective, the goal will only remain on our tongues. When a person aspires to achieve something, he can only succeed when his aspiration becomes an objective, which he is passionate and determined to fulfil. Merely wishing and dreaming without any effort does not bring any progress or success.

Learn the Sunnah

After this objective becomes embedded in our hearts and minds, it is inevitable that we will want to strive to attain this. In this regard, it is essential that we first learn about the Sunnah. There are many good and authentic books from which we can learn about the ways of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam. A few are listed hereunder:

  • Ash-Shamāil At-Tirmidhī authored by Imām At-Tirmidhī rahimahullāh, with commentary by Shaykh-ul-Hadīth Mawlānā Muhammad Zakariyyā rahimahullāh;
  • The Sublime Conduct of Nabī sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam, a translation of Shamāile Kubrā authored by Muftī Muhammad Irshād Qāsmī hafizahullāh.
  • Uswae Rasūle Akram sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam, authored by Hadrat Dr. Abdul Hayy ‘Ārifī rahimahullāh.

One effective method of learning is to allocate a time of the day wherein we will learn the Sunnah. Fixing a time will ensure that we do not fall into the trap of deferring this important task. For example, allocate a time to study after supper or before going to sleep. If we can also involve our family and study the Sunnah together that will be far better, as not only will the Sunnah become a part of our lives, it will also come into the lives of our family. We do not need to allocate a lengthy period of time; if we merely aim to learn one Sunnah a day with the intention of practicing upon it, inshā’allāh, very soon we will begin to emulate the life of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam. Therefore, start immediately to learn and practice one new Sunnah a day.

Bringing into Practice

After learning the Sunnah, make a concerted effort to bring this Sunnah into our lives. The following three points will assist in bringing the Sunnah into practice:

a. Increase the love for Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam by reading and contemplating about his features and excellences. Ponder over his efforts, sacrifices and favours upon the Ummah.

b. Associate with and sit in the company of those whose lives are in accordance with the Sunnah, as this will have a positive effect on our lives.

c. Make du‘ā to Allāh ta‘ālā to assist and grant us the ability to practice. If we are struggling to bring a particular Sunnah into practice, turn to Allāh saying that you are weak and feeble and unable to make that genuine effort needed, however, He is all powerful and He is able to change this.

By making an effort in this manner it will surely bear fruit inshā’allāh and very soon we will be able to see a transformation in our lives. 

May Allāh ta‘ālā grant us all the ability to practice. Āmīn.

© Riyādul Jannah (Volume 24, Issue 9)


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