‘Īd-ul-Fitr

By Hadrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

The Night of ‘Īd
The nights of both ‘Īds are described in the hadīth as amongst the great and sacred nights in the Muslim calendar. To remain awake on the nights of ‘Īd and perform ‘ibādah is a source of great virtue and reward.

1. Abū ‘Umārah radhiyallāhu anhu relates that Rasūlullāh sallāllahu ‘alayhi wasallam said:

Whoever stays awake and performs ‘ibādah on the night of the two ‘Īds, with hope for abundant reward (from Allāh ta’ālā), his heart will not die on the day (i.e. Qiyāmah) when all hearts will be dead. (Targhīb)

2. Mu‘ādh Ibn Jabal radhiyallāhu anhu relates that Rasūlullāh sallāllahu ‘alayhi wasallam said:

Jannah is wājib (incumbent) for those who stay awake with the intention of making ‘ibādah on the following nights: 8th, 9th, 10th, of Dhul Hijjah, the night of ‘Īd-ul-Fitr and the night of the 15th of Sha‘bān. (Targhīb)

3. Imām Shafi‘ī rahimahullāh said: “Du‘ās are answered on the nights of Friday (the night between Thursday and Friday), the nights before the two ‘Īds and the 15th night of Sha‘bān.”

Sunnats of the Day of ‘Īd
1. To rise early.
2. To clean the teeth with miswāk.
3. To have a masnūn bath.
4. To dress in one’s best garments in an Islamic manner.
5. To use ‘itr (apply fragrance).
6. To eat dates or any other sweets before going for the ‘Īd-ul Fitr Salāh.
7. To go early for ‘Īd Salāh.
8. To go walking for ‘Īd Salāh.
9. To read the Takbīrāt of Tashrīq in a low voice while going for the ‘Īd Salāh.


Allāhu akbar Allāhu akbar lā ilāha illallāhu wallāhu akbar
Allāhu akbar wa lillāhil hamd

10. To use different routes to and from the place of ‘Īd Salāh.
Mas’alah: It is harām to fast on the 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th of Dhul Ḥijjah, (i.e. on ‘Īd-ul-Ad’hā and three days after) and the day of ‘Īd-ul-Fitr.

The Method of ‘Īd Salāh

1. Make niyyah (intention) of performing two raka‘āts wājib of ‘Īd-ul-Fitr behind the imām, with six wājib takbīr.
2. The first takbīr in the first rak‘ah is the takbīr tahrīmah which is followed by three wājib takbīr. Raise your hands to the ears in all four takbīr (saying the takbīr). However, after the first takbīr fold the hands under the navel and read thanā (sub’hānakallāhumma…). Thereafter, in the following two takbīr raise the hands up to the ears and drop them on the sides and after the fourth takbīr fold them again.

3. The imām will recite Sūrah-al-Fātihah and another sūrah and go into rukū‘ and sajdah etc. as usual.

4. In the second rak‘ah, after the recitation and before rukū‘ another three takbīr will be called. In all three takbīr raise the hands to the ears and drop them on the sides and go into rukū‘ when the fourth takbīr is called.

NOTE: Four takbīr are said together in each rak‘ah; at the beginning of the first rak‘ah and before going into rukū‘ in the second rak‘ah. The easy method of remembering when to drop the hands and when to fold is mentioned hereunder:

(a) Remember the following words: Fold, drop, drop, fold, for the first rak‘ah and drop, drop, drop, rukoo‘, for the second rak‘ah.
(b) Or keep the following general rule in mind: when there is something to be recited after a takbīr; the hands should be folded and when nothing is to be recited the hands are to be dropped to the sides.

Mas’alah: It is makrūh to offer any salāh in the masjid where the ‘Īd Salāh is to be performed, before or after the ‘Īd Salāh.

Mas’alah: It is also makrūh to perform any ṣalāh at home before the ‘Īd Salāh, but it is not makrūh after the ‘Īd Salāh. Hence, we should not perform nafl Salāh such as Ishrāq on ‘Īd day.

Mas’alah: If anyone missed the ‘Īd Salāh then he cannot offer it individually.

Mas’alah: Khutbah after the ‘Īd Salāh is sunnah. However, the listening of the khutbah is wājib.

Mas’alah: If anyone joins the ‘Īd Salāh after the imām has said the three takbīr in the first rak‘ah he should say his three takbīr immediately. If he joins while the imām is in rukū‘, then if he feels and has strong hope that he will say three takbīr and join the imām in rukū‘ then he should complete the takbīr before going into rukū‘. Otherwise he should join the imām in rukū‘ and say the three takbīr instead of the tasbīḥ of rukū‘.

NOTE: Whilst saying the takbīr in rukū‘, he should not raise his hands.

NOTE: If the imām rises from rukū‘ before one’s takbīr are completed, one should also rise with the imām and his takbīr will be remitted for him.

Mas’alah: If anyone missed the first rak‘ah and joined the imām in the second rak‘ah, he should say the three takbīr of the first rak‘ah after the recitation when he gets up to complete the missed rak‘ah. 

Mas’alah: If anyone joined the imām in the second rak‘ah after rukū‘, then he should perform two raka‘āts as mentioned above.

© Islāmic Da’wah Academy


• Please forward this message on to all your contacts

Advertisements

Du‘ā – A Great Gift

By Hadrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

 As believers, we all have a deep yearning to attach ourselves to our Merciful and Gracious Creator. Even the sinful aspire to do something that will please their Master and bring them closer to Him. Out of His sheer Grace and Mercy, Allāh ta‘ālā has created many ways for us to acquire this closeness. One of these is du‘ā.

Du‘ā holds special significance among the many important and spiritually uplifting forms of worship we have been bestowed with. It is an act extremely liked by Allāhta‘ālā as it represents the height of humbleness and submission to the Creator. It is for this reason it has been termed the ‘essence of ‘ibādah’ and even simply ‘‘ibādah’. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam states:

Du‘ā is the essence of ‘ibādah. (At-Tirmidhī) 

Du‘ā is ‘ibādah. (At-Tirmidhī)

Du‘ā is so important that Allāh ta‘ālā becomes displeased when His bondsman neglects it. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam states:

Allāh becomes angry with the person who does not ask from Him. (At-Tirmidhī)

By making du‘ā, we create a special connection with Allāh ta‘ālā whereby love for Him increases, faith in Him strengthens and the doors of boundless mercy are opened for us. If we do not ask from our Creator, we will never be able to create that special relationship.

Take the example of two people, one who is poor and needy and the other who is wealthy and eager to find opportunities to assist the needy. If the poor man were never to ask the rich man for assistance, he would never develop any relationship with him. However, by asking for assistance, a degree of recognition is created. If, at every time of need, he asked the rich person for help, and the rich person gave, then this would surely create love for the rich man in the poor man’s heart. Similarly, witnessing the helplessness and neediness of the poor man, mercy would increase in the heart of the rich man, and he would regard this needy person instrumental in gaining the Pleasure of the Creator. He would advise the poor man not to be hesitant in asking him for help whenever the need arises. Soon the relationship would become such that the rich man would not wait for the poor man to ask, but would bestow his generosity upon him even before that. This is just an example of how mere mortals would behave; the Mercy and Grace of Allāh ta‘ālā are beyond imagination!

Remember, du‘ā is the weapon of the believer. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallamsaid:

Verily, du‘ā is beneficial against that (affliction) which has descended as well as that which has not [yet] descended; so hold fast, O bondsmen of Allāh, to du‘ā. (At-Tirmidhī)

So we should always remain steadfast with du‘ā. Holding fast to the following points will inshā’allāh  help in this regard:

1. We need to create a habit of asking Allāh ta‘ālā for all our needs in every situation. Whether a matter is big or small, difficult or easy, we should turn to Allāhta‘ālā. Our attitude should be that even in circumstances where we are fully confident of success, du‘ā is still our first step. Even for trivial everyday needs we need to adopt the habit of turning to Allāh ta‘ālā. Our first recourse should be du‘ā and thereafter asbāb (means). Unfortunately, our approach is to turn to asbāb first and then to du‘ā, or more precisely, when the asbāb do not deliver the desired result we turn to du‘ā. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has advised us that even if the strap of a sandal breaks, we should ask Allāh ta‘ālā first before going about getting it repaired. (At-Tirmidhī)

2. Make it a practice to say a short du‘ā after every good deed, whether you are in need or not. In reality we are always in need, but sometimes we get the impression that we have no needs. Our circumstances all look favourable; we are healthy, we have sufficient finances, we have security, our children are obedient, etc. The question is: Can we be sure that these circumstances will remain same? We also need to think a little deeper: is my death on Īmān guaranteed? What about the stages of the grave? How will I fare on the Day of Resurrection? In reality, we are always in need and so should always adopt the habit of making du‘ā, even for a short while, after every good deed. If we are short of time, then there are some very concise yet comprehensive supplications which we can make at such moments, e.g.

3. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has taught us many beautiful supplications for various occasions that are amazing in their precision, conciseness, depth of meaning and appropriateness to the occasion. Contemplating their meanings increases one’s faith and love for Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam. This is such a great favour of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam upon us that we can never repay even if we were to spend our entire lives sending salutations upon him.

    Prior to my recent operation, I thought it opportune to request my akābir (elders) to make du‘ā for me. Amongst those who are especially affectionate to me is my respected Shaykh, Hadrat Mawlānā Qamaruz-zamān sāhib hafizahullāh. During our conversation, only moments before the operation, Hadrat advised me to recite one of the supplications of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam that Hadrat Shāh Wasīyullāh sāhib rahimahullāh used to frequently read.

    O Allāh, I ask You for a pure life and a peaceful death and a return that is neither disgraceful nor dishonourable.

 

    Although, this supplication is of a general nature and not stipulated for this particular situation, however, whilst pondering over the meaning of this du‘ā, I felt as if it was especially devised for the very situation I was in. All supplications of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam are priceless gems, if only we were to value them. We should learn them and make them part of our daily lives. This will also help us maintain the remembrance of Allāh ta‘ālā throughout the day.

4. There are also many supplications of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam that are not specific to any occasion. Our mashāyikh have gone to great lengths to compile these in book form so that we can benefit from them. We should make it a practice to read these compilations so that we can reap their benefits in both worlds.

    Two famous compilations are Al-Hizb Al-A‘zam and Munājāt-e-Maqbūl. It is best if we can read both daily, otherwise at least one. If this is also difficult then at the least the abridged version of Al-Hizb Al-A‘zam should be read. Similarly, Allāh ta‘ālāgranted me the tawfīq to compile those supplications in which Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam sought refuge from certain things. This compilation, called Al-Mu‘awwadhāt, will also bring great benefit if included in one’s daily practices. Istighfār is also a form du‘ā. I was also granted the tawfīq to compile the phrases of istighfār from the Qur’ān in a small booklet, and this will also be of great benefit as part of one’s daily practices.

Let us hold fast to du‘ā. It is a priceless gift and powerful tool granted to us by Allāh ta‘ālā and we should recognise it as such. We should not regard the great gift of du‘ā as a burdensome ritual carried out without any real interest or understanding of its importance.

© Riyādul Jannah (Vol. 23 No. 11, Nov 2014)

The Path to Purification

The Sharī‘ah is divided into two parts: external and internal. The department of Sharī‘ah relating to external deeds like salāh and zakāh is called ‘fiqh’, while the one dealing with internal feelings and states of the heart is called ‘tasawwuf’. Both are commands in the Qur’ān. Thus, while commanding salāh and zakāh, the Qur’ān also commands gratefulness and love of Allāh ta‘ālā, and condemns the evil of pride and vanity.

Similarly, in the books of hadīth, along with the chapters on ‘ibādāt, trade and commerce, and marriage and divorce, are to be found the chapters on riyā (showing off), takabbur, hasad, sabr, shukr etc. These commands are as much a mandatory requirement as the ones dealing with external deeds.

On reflection, it will be realised that all the external deeds are designed for the reformation of the heart. That is the basis of success in the hereafter, while the despoiling of the heart is the cause of total destruction. This is precisely what is known in technical terms as tasawwuf. Its focus is tahzīb-al-akhlāq (the adornment of character); its motive is the attainment of Divine Pleasure; its method is total obedience to the commands of the Sharī‘ah.

Tasawwuf is the soul of Islām. Its function is to purify the heart from the lowly, bestial attributes of lust, evils of the tongue, anger, malice, jealousy, love of the world, love of fame, niggardliness, greed, ostentation, vanity, deception etc. At the same time, it aims to adorn the heart with the lofty attributes of repentance, perseverance, gratefulness, fear of Allāh ta‘ālā, hope, abstinence, tawhīd, trust, love, sincerity, truth, contemplation etc.

To diagnose and treat the diseases of the heart normally requires the help of an expert mentor or shaykh. Here are the qualities of a good shaykh:

1. He possesses necessary religious knowledge.

2. His beliefs, habits and practices are in accordance with the Sharī‘ah.

3. He does not harbour greed for worldly wealth.

4. He has himself spent time learning from a good shaykh.

5. The scholars and good mashā’ikh of his time hold a good opinion about him.

6. His admirers are mostly from among the people who have good understanding of the religion.

7. Most of his followers follow the Sharī‘ah and are not seekers after this world.

8.  He sincerely tries to educate and morally train his followers. If he sees anything wrong in them, he corrects it.

9. In his company, one can feel a decrease in the love of the world and an increase in the love for Allāh ta‘ālā.

10. He himself regularly performs dhikr and spiritual exercises.

In searching for a shaykh, do not look for his ability to perform miracles (karāmāt) or to foretell the future. A very good shaykh may not be able to show any miracles. On the other hand, a person showing supernatural feats does not have to be a pious person, or even a Muslim. The prominent Shaykh Bayazid Bustami says: ‘Do not be deceived if you see a performer of supernatural feats flying in the air. Measure him on the standards of the Sharī‘ah.’

When you find the right shaykh, and you are satisfied with his ability to provide spiritual guidance, you perform bay‘ah or pledge. This is a two-way commitment; the shaykh pledges to guide you in the light of Sharī‘ah and you pledge to follow him.