Double Standards

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

By Mawlana Abul Hasan Ali Nadwi (Allah have mercy on him)
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The Sole Treatment for all Evils
Cast a glance at those countries where the work of inviting to Allāh ta‛ālā, spirituality, true Allāh-worship and purification of the self has stopped for some time. And at the number of ‛ulamā’ (who pave the way for a connection between humans and Allāh ta‛ālā, and who direct them towards their internal rectification) which has dropped so much either because of the influence of Western civilization, being in close proximity to the West or for other reasons. In those countries you will find a vacuum – a terrifying and lengthy vacuum – which can neither be filled by extensive and in-depth knowledge, intelligence and sharpness of mind, literary skills, a deep bond with Arabic language and literature, genealogical relations, nor freedom and autonomy. This is a spiritual and moral dilemma for which there is no solution.
The upper classes and the masses have succumbed to a universal materialism, blind love for wealth, and other social and moral illnesses. The educated people and intellectuals (whether religious education and culture o r materialist) are all trapped in spiritual ailments such as the love for position and authority, jealousy and miserliness, pride and egotism, the desire for popularity, hypocrisy and flattery, and an awe for matter and power.
As for social and political movements they have been ruined by selfishness, an absence of training and weakness of their leaders.
As for institutes and organizations, mutual differences, a lack of perceiving their responsibilities, desire for the world, and a love for increase in salaries have rendered them useless. They have confined themselves to doing these things only.
As for the  ‛ulam ā ’ , externalism, superficiality, paying lipservice, unnecessary and pointless fear for poverty, desire for comforts and enjoyment have ruined their respect and dignity.
The treatment for all this can be found in nothing but that prophetic purification which is mentioned in the  Qur’ān , which is the objective of commissioning Rasūlullāh s allallāhu ‛alayhi wa sallam, and in that rabbānīyyat which is required of the ‛ulamā’.  تنك امبو بتكلا نوملعت متنك امب يننبر اونوك نكلو نوسردت م
Become the men of Allāh as you used to teach the Book and just as you yourself used to study it.
I am not stressing any particular form of tazkiyah as is common nowadays, and which in the latter days is referred to as tasawwuf. I do not consider all the flag bearers of tasawwuf to be completely free from every erroneous way and misunderstanding, nor do I consider them to be sinless. However, what I can say is that it most essential for the vacuum which has crept into our lives and our society be filled as quickly as possible. For this, it is necessary for tazkiyah, ihsān and spiritual jurisprudence to be revived just as our predecessors had revived it in their respective times. All this has to be on the system of prophet-hood, in the light of the Qur’ān and Sunnah. This work is vital in every era and every place where Muslims are living. It is most crucial because this vacuum is a major serious vacuum, and it has far-reaching consequences on our individual and collective lives.
I would like to quote an Arab poet who speaks about those who criticize those who fulfilled this responsibility in their respective eras and rendered this service.  مكيبلأ ابأ لا مهيلع اولقأ– اودس يلذا نكالما اودس وأ موللا نم
May you be bereft of a father! Either stop denigrating them or fill the vacuum which they filled.
Too many criticisms have been levelled against these servants of Allāh. The question is if there is anyone to take their place who would treat the pain?
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Reading Qur’an Without Understanding

Why we read Qur’an in Arabic even we don’t understand it.
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This is a beautiful story!
An old American Muslim lived on a farm in the mountains of eastern Kentucky with his young grandson. Each morning Grandpa was up early sitting at the kitchen table reading his Qur’an. His grandson wanted to be just like him and tried to imitate him in every way he could. One day the grandson asked, “Grandpa! I try to read the Qur’an just like you but I don’t understand it, and what I do understand I forget as soon as I close the book. What good does reading the Qur’an do?”
The Grandfather quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and replied, “Take this coal basket down to the river and bring me back a basket of water..”
The boy did as he was told, but all the water leaked out before he got back to the house. The grandfather laughed and said, “You’ll have to move a little faster next time,” and sent him back to the river with the basket to try again. This time the boy ran faster, but again the basket was empty before he returned home. Out of breath, he told his grandfather that it was impossible to carry water in a basket, and he went to get a bucket instead. The old man said, “I don’t want a bucket of water; I want a basket of water. You’re just not trying hard enough,” and he went out the door to watch the boy try again.
At this point, the boy knew it was impossible, but he wanted to show his grandfather that even if he ran as fast as he could, the water would Leak out before he got back to the house. The boy again dipped the basket into river and ran hard, but when he reached his grandfather the basket was again empty. Out of breath, he said, “See Grandpa, it’s useless!” “So you think it is useless?” The old man said, “Look at the basket.”
The boy looked at the basket and for the first time realized that the basket was different. It had been transformed from a dirty old coal basket and was now clean, inside and out.
“Son, that’s what happens when you read the Qur’an. You might not understand or remember everything, but when you read it, you will be Changed, inside and out. That is the work of Allah in our lives.”
If you feel this is worth reading, please forward to your contacts/friends. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) says: “The one who guides to good will be rewarded equally”.

Stay in your lane!

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LONG READ..but essential reading:

“The number of Muslims who don’t stay in their lane, speaking about things they are not qualified on, or ready for, is growing fast; it’s like a viral breakout, a disease which has become endemic amongst us.

Social media really has become a fitnah for them. It gave a platform to those who should not be on it.

Perhaps they were saved from clubbing or dating or doing drugs etc, and instead started “practising” only to become addicted to another drug which is even worse: speaking without knowledge, “educating” without being educated, “warning” when ignorant, typing because they simply can, and so on.

Once one is bitten by the bug of fame and attention, it is near impossible to go back. You think you can start talking about usul because of a few classes you take, and you think you can talk about bid’ah because you can pronounce the letter ‘ayn – in fact, they always seem to have a great letter ‘ayn, right? – and you think you can teach when you are wholly ignorant of the Shari’ah, and you think you can try and explain matters when you don’t even know the Arabic language, let alone all the sciences that follow.

Is this status about YOU? Yes it is. I don’t need to mention one name as a flag-bearer of this disease when I aiming this at 50 of you who try and do the same but at varying levels of success. If you’re thinking “it’s me he’s talking about”, then you’d be right. If you’re feeling paranoid right now, you should be. Because I *am* talking about you. Yes I’ve read your statements. Yes I also have a personal account on social media too and see and read what everyone else is talking about on my friends and liked lists. You shouldn’t have gone there in the first place. This is what happens. If you rise like a balloon, full of gas, then expect someone to pop you when you talk nonsense or try to come across as someone you’re not and mislead people. Is that me judging you? Sure thing. Hatin’ on you? Absolutely. Forcing you to only stick to what you’re good at. Correct.

You wanted to give da’wah? Your keeping silent for a good few years will be the best da’wah you will ever give. You want to be an activist? Get off FB and actually get active and help someone. We don’t need any more heroes online. The world doesn’t need you. Believe me, it doesn’t. Your style isn’t so new, and your approach isn’t so unique so as to justify the masses being exposed to an ignoramus. There is a huge difference between sharing content from qualified people and reminding folks that way – a great and encouraged thing – and you trying to do reminding from your own pocket and not knowing what you’re talking about.

And sometimes, you *will* know what you’re talking about, but you should remain silent. Just to learn the system. Just to learn the skill of patience and humility. It will serve you well later when it is time for you to lead.

I studied for nearly seven years – that’s full time, not part time classes, and that’s proper studying, not “practising” and living as a Muslim – before my teacher told me to go public with da’wah. My mouth and my fingers were quiet during that time. I studied for another seven before I had the belief and support from my teachers that I should have an opinion that is worth listening to. It’s taken me another five years to realise that opinion isn’t worth much at all, wa Allahu’l-Musta’an.

Son, just stay in your lane. Please. For your own sake.”

(Shaykh Abu Eesa Niamatullah via his FB page 4/1/2016)