Practically Implementing Prophetic Optimism

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

 

When Ibrahim (as) famously left Hajar (as) with their baby son in the desert, she asked him if Allah commanded him to leave them. He said yes, so she said that she trusted Allah would take care of them.

Her response to the situation illuminated a middle path between two extremes we commonly see.

One extreme is pessimism. A person may simply give up and lose hope. After scanning the horizon and seeing no food, water, or any sign of civilization, it would be easy to sit down and do nothing. People with a negative mindset will focus on all the things wrong in this situation – there’s no food, we’ll probably die here – and overwhelm themselves with hopelessness.

The other extreme is naive optimism. It is sitting there doing nothing while telling yourself everything will work out. Or perhaps to simply “envision” a better situation and hope it will arrive.

Hajar demonstrated what optimism looks like.

The action of her heart was to trust Allah and have faith that He would make a way out. The action of her limbs was to do everything in her control to remedy the situation. No food? Then she will run back and forth between mountains looking for something to give her child.

She set a precedent that embodies the prophetic tradition, “tie your camel, and then trust in Allah.”

When it comes to the sunnah of the Prophet (s) we rarely talk about mindsets. The sunnah of optimism provides a playbook for dealing with the major and minor difficulties in our lives.

It’s amazing to think that he was tested more than anyone else, and yet, his default demeanor was always smiling.

True optimism provides the resolve to deal with difficulty.

When we look back at the most difficult moments of our lives, we actually cherish them. Those hardships, failures, and scars are what made us into who we are today. They made us stronger and provided lessons so invaluable we’d never trade them for anything.

This is easy in hindsight, but harder to do in the moment – “Patience is at the first strike of calamity.”

The prophetic example shows us how to cultivate a mindset of optimism.

He (saw) warned against giving up on people. “Whoever says the people are destroyed, he is the most destroyed amongst them (Muslim).” And Allah (swt) says in the Qur’an, “Do not lose heart or despair, and you will be superior if you are [true] believers (3:139).”

Despair is easy to feel almost by default. Every time we turn on our phones we are bombarded with headlines, photos, and videos of injustices that make it seem as if the world is going down the tubes. The lens of the believer necessitates understanding that our faith in Allah means knowing Allah is the source of all that is good, and He will never decree something in which the evil outweighs the good – even if that good is reserved for the akhirah.

The Prophet (s), even in the most dire circumstances, would look for excuses to be optimistic. When the Muslims set out for umrah, and were blocked by the Quraysh, the situation was tense. Negotiators kept coming but no agreement could be reached. Finally, the Quraysh sent Suhayl b. Amr, and the Prophet (s) took this as a good sign. The name Suhayl has a connotation of ease, and so the Prophet (s) announced to his companions that this was a good sign. Eventually, the treaty of Hudaybiyah was agreed upon – a victory in and of itself, even if it was unclear at the time as to how.

He even engineered the environment around him to be one that instills optimism. When he met someone from a place called the ‘Valley of Misguidance’, he renamed it the ‘Valley of Guidance’. This shows us that the way we refer to things even has a subconscious effect on us. What is the subconscious effect, for example, of referring to one’s spouse as “the old ball and chain” over and over again? When his (saw) grandson was born, Ali (ra) named him Harb (war). The Prophet (s) changed his name to Hasan (good).

He encouraged his companions to always be of those spreading good to others. He instructed them, “give glad tidings, and do not scare people away. Make things easy, do not make things difficult.”

The most important optimism is the optimism in Allah. The Prophet (s) relates to us that Allah said, “I am as my servant expects me and I am with him as he remembers me.” If you believe that Allah intends to make your life difficult, or that He is vengeful toward you (audhubillah), then that is what you will get. If you believe that Allah loves His creation, and intends what is best for them, and wants to forgive them – then you will find Allah (swt) as such.

When we inevtibaly encounter difficulty in our lives, we must tackle those problems head and and work our hardest to deal with them. We remind ourselves in those moments, that ultimately things will work out for the best, because we know that what Allah decrees for us is good and He will give us the strength and ability to make it through what we are dealing with.

“Our Lord, and burden us not with that which we have no ability to bear. And pardon us; and forgive us; and have mercy upon us (2:186).”

 

Omar Usman – link

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Double Standards

By Mawlana Abul Hasan Ali Nadwi (Allah have mercy on him)
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The Sole Treatment for all Evils
Cast a glance at those countries where the work of inviting to Allāh ta‛ālā, spirituality, true Allāh-worship and purification of the self has stopped for some time. And at the number of ‛ulamā’ (who pave the way for a connection between humans and Allāh ta‛ālā, and who direct them towards their internal rectification) which has dropped so much either because of the influence of Western civilization, being in close proximity to the West or for other reasons. In those countries you will find a vacuum – a terrifying and lengthy vacuum – which can neither be filled by extensive and in-depth knowledge, intelligence and sharpness of mind, literary skills, a deep bond with Arabic language and literature, genealogical relations, nor freedom and autonomy. This is a spiritual and moral dilemma for which there is no solution.
The upper classes and the masses have succumbed to a universal materialism, blind love for wealth, and other social and moral illnesses. The educated people and intellectuals (whether religious education and culture o r materialist) are all trapped in spiritual ailments such as the love for position and authority, jealousy and miserliness, pride and egotism, the desire for popularity, hypocrisy and flattery, and an awe for matter and power.
As for social and political movements they have been ruined by selfishness, an absence of training and weakness of their leaders.
As for institutes and organizations, mutual differences, a lack of perceiving their responsibilities, desire for the world, and a love for increase in salaries have rendered them useless. They have confined themselves to doing these things only.
As for the  ‛ulam ā ’ , externalism, superficiality, paying lipservice, unnecessary and pointless fear for poverty, desire for comforts and enjoyment have ruined their respect and dignity.
The treatment for all this can be found in nothing but that prophetic purification which is mentioned in the  Qur’ān , which is the objective of commissioning Rasūlullāh s allallāhu ‛alayhi wa sallam, and in that rabbānīyyat which is required of the ‛ulamā’.  تنك امبو بتكلا نوملعت متنك امب يننبر اونوك نكلو نوسردت م
Become the men of Allāh as you used to teach the Book and just as you yourself used to study it.
I am not stressing any particular form of tazkiyah as is common nowadays, and which in the latter days is referred to as tasawwuf. I do not consider all the flag bearers of tasawwuf to be completely free from every erroneous way and misunderstanding, nor do I consider them to be sinless. However, what I can say is that it most essential for the vacuum which has crept into our lives and our society be filled as quickly as possible. For this, it is necessary for tazkiyah, ihsān and spiritual jurisprudence to be revived just as our predecessors had revived it in their respective times. All this has to be on the system of prophet-hood, in the light of the Qur’ān and Sunnah. This work is vital in every era and every place where Muslims are living. It is most crucial because this vacuum is a major serious vacuum, and it has far-reaching consequences on our individual and collective lives.
I would like to quote an Arab poet who speaks about those who criticize those who fulfilled this responsibility in their respective eras and rendered this service.  مكيبلأ ابأ لا مهيلع اولقأ– اودس يلذا نكالما اودس وأ موللا نم
May you be bereft of a father! Either stop denigrating them or fill the vacuum which they filled.
Too many criticisms have been levelled against these servants of Allāh. The question is if there is anyone to take their place who would treat the pain?

To Debate or not to Debate?

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Narrated by Aisha (Allah be pleased with her) : The Prophet (ﷺ) said, “The most hated person in the sight of Allah is the most quarrelsome person.” (Bukhari)

 

There’s an amazing Hadith found in Musnad Ahmad, Tabarani, Ibn Majah, Tirmidhi and others… It says, “No people have gone astray after having been upon guidance, except that they were given argumentation.”
ما ضل قوم بعد هدى كانوا عليه إلا أوتوا الجدل
If you’ve been around Muslim life long enough, you can sense when a time-wasting black-hole is developing. It’s very tempting to go in swinging. Most youth do simply out of lack of experience. But for those who’ve been around the block, what is the point of experience, if you simply keep falling for the allure of the black hole.
Whenever an issue comes up, our stance is that we just state the position—insist on it no matter what—and move on. One of the signs of misguided groups is that they’re always arguing. In contrast, the path our Ulama have put us upon — Allah guard them and protect them — is one in which we’re really just too busy for nonsense. We have Quran to review, and still more to memorize. We have to brush up on our Arabic regularly. Fiqh needs to be delved into. Sound Aqidah needs to be taught. Hours of dhikr need to be logged. And on top of that, there is charity to be given, youth-work to be done, Janazahs to attend. Before all of that we have families to take care of. And then suddenly, it’s Ramadhan and all of that goes on hold and we put our souls through the car-wash.
Through Masajid, retreats, trips abroad, etc, life as a Muslim makes you meet so many different types of people, that it broadens your experience and polishes your Akhlaq. People are always changing. One year they’re into something knee deep and another year, they’ve balanced out. One becomes more forgiving, calm and over-looking. With every year that passes, and every drama that comes around, reaches its high point and then and rolls away like a receding wave, you come to realize what really matters in life and in deen. And that causes a person to side-step jidaal, argumentation. State your point—you may have to state it often—then move on and leave off arguing.
Imam Malik (Allah have mercy on him) was approached by a man who asked him for a debate. Malik said, “What happens if I win?” The man said I will follow you. Imam Malik (Allah have mercy on him) said, “And if you win?” The man said, then you follow me. Then Imam Malik (Allah have mercy nn him) said, “What if a third person comes and defeats both of us?” The man said, then we both follow him. Malik concluded: “Constantly changing your beliefs is not a sign of steadfastness. I know what I am upon and I have no doubt. You however, are upon doubt. So leave me alone and go debate someone else filled with doubt.”
(Tartib al-Madarik)
One of his students said, “Shall I not try to argue with them to prove to them the truth?” Imam Malik (Allah have mercy on him) replied, “Just state the position and leave it at that. If he wants to follow it, he will.”

(Tartib al-Madarik)

It was narrated that Hudhaifah (Allah be pleased with him) said: “I heard the Messenger of Allah(ﷺ) say:‘Do not acquire knowledge in order to show off before the scholars, or to argue with the foolish, or to attract people’s attention, for whoever does that will be in Hell.'” (Ibn Majah as weak)
Those who will last the test of time are those who have something to offer. Something objective, meaty, beneficial, balanced and diverse.
Allah make us from those people, both as students and transmitters.
And Allah keep us away from argumentation, the sign of misguided people and groups.

Ameen.

Ibn Abbas (Allah be pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allah(ﷺ): “Do not argue with your brother, do not joke with him, and do not make a promise, only to not fulfill it.” (Tirmidhi as weak)
Dr Shady Elmasray (Hafidhahullah)

TAKE ME BACK

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Take me back to the old Paths, when Mums were at home. Dads were at work. Brothers went into the army. And sisters got married BEFORE having children!
Crime did not pay; Hard work did; And people knew the difference.
Mums could cook; Dads would work; Children would behave…Husbands were loving; Wives were supportive; and children were polite.
Women wore the dresses; and Men wore the trousers. Women looked like ladies; Men looked like gentlemen; and children looked decent.
People loved the truth, and hated a lie; They came to masjids to get IN, Not to get OUT!
Sermons sounded helpful;
Rejoicing sounded normal; and crying sounded sincere. Cursing was wicked; Drinking was evil; and divorce was unthinkable.
We read the Quran in public; prayed in school;
And reminded fellow Muslims the words of the Quran: to be called a Muslim was worth living for; to be called a kafir was a shame!
Sex was a personal word. homosexuality was an unheard word, and abortion was an illegal word.
Preachers preached because they read, understood, digested and acted on their words:
Leaders gave instructions with the fear of Allah, followers followed the rules and regulations of the community, sinners sought forgiveness from their Lord.
Being an imam meant you told people the word of Allah, being a Muslim meant you would live for the hereafter and not the dunya.
Laws were based on how Quran spelt it, homes read the Quran and Hadith; and masjids taught the Quran and the ways of the Prophet AS.
Shaykhs were more interested in new cpnverts than in new clothes and new cars. Children were more interested in learning their religion:
Give me that old time religion! This is good enough for me! I still like the “Old Path.”
MAY ALLAH MAKE YOU FROM THE PEOPLE HE LOVES AND GUIDE US TO THE RIGHT PATH.
ALLAH HUMMA AMEEN💕
Anonymous
future

The Catastrophe of Ghouta

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Heart breaking! Allah help the people of Ghouta and all around the world who are being oppressed make dua for them and give to trusted reliable charity

🔴please be aware the following text is very upsetting – an account from a Doctor in Ghouta, Syria – Allah have mercy on them and all the oppressed and may He grant them ease soon and may He protect us all🔴

Please, please take a few minutes to read what Doctor Housam Adnan wrote from #EasternGhouta yesterday:

From the womb of the dead
For more than twenty years, the scalpel was my companion
Dancing between my fingers, while I do my work very quietly
At the end of each day I whisper to it:
You did very well, and we saved many together
But everything changed now
The scalpel wasn’t what it used to be, lately
My fingers can’t handle it anymore
As if a part of my soul was taken into its teeth, and it can’t bear the wounds it witnesses anymore
Children without parts
Without eyes
Without faces
Women and families covered by sheets full of soil from the home land, with more of her children’s blood
The smell of gunpowder and its abhorred black color hangs over those hungry, withered faces
The screams of children, the wailing of women, the oppression of men, the impotence of doctors, reached my dead scalpel, creating a spirit of the misery inside it, that it stopped working after what it witnessed, but those cries did not reach the hearts of the world to awake it

Today, all those who came to us are slim skinny bodies that haven’t tasted food for days. Buried with their children under the rubble of those barrels that do not distinguish between stones and human.
Today from under the rubble of our homeland they brought to me a mother in her seventh month of pregnancy, with two of her children.
If I told you that the misery of the world came together in the eyes of those children, I wouldn’t be describing enough,
The first child without a right leg and has a broken arm. The other has lost his eye and shrapnel entered his chest, and the mother is struggling to survive. The shrapnel has broken all of her slim body sending to our hands to witness her last breath.
I see her struggling for survival, her eyes are fixed on her little ones being in that situation
The father left them, dead, a few months ago
They brought them to me in one cover, because we lost our Patient stretchers, we used them as beds, because beds are full
I beg you to imagine with me, just for a moment that scene and that torn, torn blanket that carried the four lives: the mother, her fetus and her two children.

A colleague whispered in my ear
Maybe we can save her baby
For the first time, I sat down thinking with my head down
“do we save him, or leave him happy with his mother without seeing the ugliness of this world,
Do I let him go with her
No.. no
My mission is to save him
I looked around
Her torn children
Her soul that’s leaving her body
The noise of planes and exploding barrels
Children’s crying that burns the heart
And my colleague whispering:
What are you waiting for
Come on

There’s a life we should get out
I looked at my scalpel and friend
To what life will you get him out?
The world of barrels, fire and disappointment?
The world of orphanhood, oppression and hunger?
Who will breastfeed him?
Who will change his pampers?
Who will rock him?
Who will hear his weeping?
Yes, he has a god that won’t give up on him, but I became unable, along with my scalpel, to even think
My colleague’s voice awoke me from my fantasies
“her heart stopped”
I’ll take him out now, with her dead
And for the first time in my life, I couldn’t do it, my scalpel stopped me. I put it on the table, and left in silence.
My colleague continued his work, his eyes full of tears, while looking at me in surprise
All that incident took only a few minutes, but it marked a years-long wound, a wound made of defeat and impotence. I didn’t imagine I’d read in the stories of Tatars’ massacres, inquisition stories, or even the pharaoh’s tales.

World, leaders and kings of the world:
Your silence over these massacres affecting hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians, who did nothing except being on a land called “Al Ghouta of Damascus” is a shame
I’m not going to ask you to save #Ghouta, but to save your humanity
Save your people
Your children
And be sure, this baby coming out of his martyr mother is your responsibility
Feed him
Keep him warm
Give him his right in living a decent life
Stop these sky monsters with the barrels of death
Come and join the children of Ghouta
Touch their faces, listen to their hungry stomach’s noises
Aren’t they humans?
Announce that you care about all humans, not only your blood like, this would save what’s left of god’s spirit in you

#SaveGhouta
#Save Syria

ADVICE FROM BAGHDAD REGARDING OUR MADARIS

Hadhrat Mufti Muhammad Taqi Uthmani (  حفظه الله ) has written regarding his journey to Baghdad:
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“Baghdad is that city which for centuries had been at the center of the Islamic world. The mere sight of this city reminds one of the glorious days of the Abbāsi khilāfat.
Upon reaching Baghdad I enquired whether there were any Madāris (seminaries) present in which Islamic knowledge is imparted in accordance with the ways of the pious predecessors.
I was informed that all such Madāris had now been converted into schools and universities. Now, the knowledge of Deen can only be attained from university faculties, such places wherein Islam is taught as mere theory, similar to ancient philosophy. Islam can neither be seen in the lives of the students nor in the Ustādhs (teachers).  Forget bring religious scholars, on seeing their appearance, one wonders if they are even Muslim.
“This is just like how orientalists study Islam today, in the universities of America, Canada, and Europe. If you read their books and articles you will come across the names of such books that many of our Ulamā have never even heard about. It seems as if deep tahqīq (research) is being made. But [sadly], in spite of swimming in the ocean of Islamic knowledge from morning till evening, they return dry as bone. No effect of what they rigorously study can be seen in their lives. The soul of this knowledge has been destroyed. “
Mufti Taqi Uthmani thereafter asked if they could at least direct him to an Ālim (scholar) of the old school of thought, so that he could present himself at his service.
He was directed to a Masjid close to the tomb of Shaykh `Abd al-Qādir al-Jīlani (رحمة الله ), in which was a Maktab.
Here he met an old pious-looking man. Mufti Taqi Usmani described his meeting with him in the following words:
“On seeing him, I felt as if I was in the presence of a pious Allah-fearing Ālim. He was sitting on a straw mat, dressed in coarse clothing, and eating dry bread. The light of the Sharī`ah could be discerned on his forehead.
“After making salaam, he enquired regarding my name and the place from which I had come. He also asked about the condition of the Madāris of our country, their syllabus, and the manner in which the kitābs (books) are taught.
Tears flowed from his eyes as I mentioned the names of the kitābs found in the Dars-e-Nizami syllabus [the syllabus used by Islamic seminaries across the Indian subcontinent].
He asked, “Are these kitābs still being taught!?”
“I replied in the affirmative. He then explained, ‘Today, we have been deprived of even hearing the names of these kitābs.
These kitābs create Allah-conscious men, they create true Muslims. In our country these books are no longer taught.
I beg you to convey this message of mine to the Ulamā and the masses of your country, that for the sake of Allah عز و جل , they should bear everything , but should never allow the destruction of such Madāris wherein these kitābs are taught!’ ”
The enemies of Islam are fully conscious of the fact that as long as these simple Mawlānas, sitting on straw mats, are present in society, they cannot remove Īmān (faith) from the hearts of the Muslims.
Therefore the enemies of Islam are making all out effort to remove these Madāris.
iraq

2017: Problems with the world

2018

  1. Criticism – Nobody can accept it, I guess the truth hurts. We are living in absolute arrogant times where you cannot say anything to anyone. Nobody wants to know whether they are right or wrong, whether they offended someone or said something harsh or abusive. People just don’t want to know. I do feel it is worse in the West, we are more arrogant and narcissistic. From an Islamic point of view, the Prophet Muhammad PBUH said, “Arrogance is to deny the truth and think low of people.” (Saheeh Muslim) So if you are wrong and cannot accept it, you clearly have ego issues! Anybody can be criticised, whether they are a scholar or not. An Islamic organisation, madrasah, school or charity. Just because we donate to them for the sake of Allah, doesn’t stop us from criticising them when they do actions contrary to Islam. Good intentions don’t always count when you lack knowledge.
  2. Parents – Some think they know everything, especially when it comes to their kids. They don’t! And loving your child does NOT mean you give them everything they want. How can a five-year-old know what is good for him/her? Just like kids don’t like injections, but we still give it to them? As we know what is good for them (and what is not). If you spoil your children, it won’t even be the age of sixteen (probably before that) you will start to regret it. “Beware. every one of you is a shepherd and every one is answerable with regard to his flock. The Caliph is a shepherd over the people and shall be questioned about his subjects (as to how he conducted their affairs). A man is a guardian over the members of his family and shal be questioned about them (as to how he looked after their physical and moral well-being). A woman is a guardian over the household of her husband and his children and shall be questioned about them (as to how she managed the household and brought up the children). A slave is a guardian over the property of his master and shall be questioned about it (as to how he safeguarded his trust). Beware, every one of you is a guardian and every one of you shall be questioned with regard to his trust.” (Saheeh Muslim)
  3. Passive people – There is no doubt we live in an apathetic society. We see crime, oppression and injustice but we just turn a blind eye. I am not talking about Palestine and Syria, I am talking about the dhulm in your own backyard. Men are to blame first and foremost, because men are no longer men. We have a lot of “males” in society, very few (real) men. Then I blame religious folk, who say “Pray Salah, read Qur’an and do Dhikr… everything will be okay?!” On the day of Badr the Prophet ﷺ didn’t just pray Qur’an and do Dhikr! Be active, “evil spreads not because of the violence of bad people, but because of the SILENCE of good people.” We need to speak up, people are not afraid to speak lies, why should we be afraid to speak the truth? Let’s not be selfish and don’t apply the rule: each to their own. That’s not an Islamic rule. “The best of jihad is a just word spoken to an unjust ruler.” (Ibn Majah)
  4. Da’wah – Not enough people that do it, or do it properly. Then you have the other half who don’t do it at all… this really needs a separate article altogether. Let’s start with “practice what you preach.” Many people don’t even read the hadith/messages they paste on to Whatsapp/Facebook. Secondly, we have people who say if you are not perfect or your family is not perfect you can’t give da’wah. These are definitely words from a Satanic mouth, a true deception of Shaytan. None of us are perfect, so none of us should do da’wah? Exactly what Shaytan wants? Even the uncles of the Prophet ﷺ did not accept Islam, they were Kafir and died as Kafirs. Does this mean the Prophet ﷺ should not have given da’wah to the rest of the world? Think before you speak, people. We now come on to the “fast forwarders” as I call them. They forward anything and everything under the name of Da’wah. When did the Prophet ﷺ say forward fabricated messages? When did the Prophet ﷺ say don’t verify things before forwarding? When did the Prophet ﷺ say if someone asks you for a reference, be defensive and arrogant because your ego cannot accept you are wrong? You get my drift, no further comments. “Do not tell a lie against me for whoever tells a lie against me (intentionally) then he will surely enter the Hell-fire.” (Bukhari)
  5. Fake people – Crocodiles tears, fake smiles, empty messages, people meet you with two faces, nothing from the heart. Why? The Ummah has become all about numbers. Number of followers on social media, we attend lots of talks but not a single change in our life. Madrasahs and schools have become all about numbers, as long as the seats gets full and fees are paid (and we are in surpluses), we are happy. And people perform excessive Hajj and Umrah, but no substance, no spirituality, not an iota of change. We really need a reality check. We have hundreds in the Masjid, we give thousands in Zakah, we are millions in Hajj, but our hearts are not clean. We really are fake and pseudo Muslims. “He who is two-faced in this world will have two tongues of fire on the Day of Resurrection.” (Abu Dawud)
  6. Social Media – Some of you are on absoTOTALutely everything!!! Facebook and Instagram and Snapchat and Twitter and WhatsApp and Telegram, like seriously? That is sad. Definitely for people with no life. I honestly just about manage with WhatsApp messages (I hardly even check people’s statuses). Committing yourself to all of these is like a full-time job, not even a part time job. Then you end up upsetting people and offending people, let alone all the debates and arguments you have. Press pause. Stop. Take a breath. And seriously quit the ones you don’t need, the ones that are eating you up and eating your time up. Maybe the last sentence should say, “stick with one.” A lot of us do sit on our phones all day, even at work. But some people don’t. Don’t call me judgemental, with WhatsApp you can see everything. Those who are always on their phones and those who check social media first thing in the morning. Is it really that important to you? And don’t say “emergency”. Emergencies don’t occur every day. Time is valuable, it is priceless. Imam Ibn ul Qayyim (rahimahullah) stated: ”Time wasting is more serious than death because time wasting cuts you off from Allah and the home of the afterlife, whereas death cuts you off from the worldly life and its people.’’ [Source: Al-Fawaaid…page 59]
  7. Don’t judge me – Shaytan’s latest plot in spreading evil and preventing good. We have an obligation to enjoin good and forbid evil. If you SEE someone doing bad, stop them. How is that judgemental? Judgemental is when you don’t have evidence. You don’t need to be afraid if you are polite and pleasant in your words. The bigger problem is we don’t have enough people speaking up and stopping evil, so the few that do it, it becomes harder. We have too many ‘yes men’, who bow down to the needs of the people. As Muslims we only bow to the One on the throne (may He be exalted). Here’s one I made earlier.
  8. Impatient & Thinking the worst of people. We are living in super fast times. We don’t just eat a lot of fast food, we want everything fast and quick. We want fast replies to our texts and calls, if we call someone and they don’t answer (maybe because they are busy/in salah/driving/in the toilet) we get offended or automatically assume they are ignoring us. Most of us have zero patience. Be a bit more considerate, some people are busier than others. You think I am wrong? Next time your YouTube video is buffering for a few seconds, look how angry and frustrated you get?! It takes a few seconds to wait for it. Half of us would just switch the video off because we don’t have the patience to wait. Read more here. Driving and patience is another one, especially in the Asian community. Asian drivers have the least patience and some have no common sense, but you can’t teach them common sense. So I end here.

Ismail ibn Nazir Satia (one who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure)

12 Rabiul Thani 1439

HOW TO START A NEW YEAR: https://mylittlebreathingspace.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/the-new-year/