Quenching the Thirst of Others


By Shaykh-ul-Hadīth, Hadrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

Imām Al-Bukhārī rahimahullāh has narrated a hadīth on the authority of Sayyidunā Abū Hurayrah radhiyallāhu ‘anhu that Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam said, “A person, whilst on a journey, experienced extreme thirst. [Along the way, he came across a well so] he climbed down this well and drank from it. He then climbed out of the well and saw a dog panting and licking the moist soil due to [extreme] thirst. This person said [to himself], ‘Indeed this dog has faced the same dilemma [of thirst] that I faced.’ [So he climbed down the well again and] filled his leather sock with water. He then climbed out whilst holding his sock with his teeth and quenched the thirst of the dog. Allāh ta‘ālā appreciated his deed and forgave his sins. The Sahābah radhiyallāhu ‘anhum asked, ‘Is there reward for us in [being kind to] animals?’ Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam replied, ‘There is reward in [being kind to] every living creature’.”

Many lessons can be derived from this hadīth, but I wish to draw your attention to a specific lesson, that of providing water for the creation of Allāh ta‘ālā. It is evident that the deed that attracted the Mercy of Allāh ta‘ālā was quenching the thirst of a dog.

Water – A Gift from Allāh

Water is an essential need of a human; a person can survive weeks without food, but only days without water. The body’s function is dependent on water and all its essential organs need a constant supply. As the body cannot make its own water, a person needs to supply the body with water. This important need of humans is provided by Allāh ta‘ālā himself in the form of rain, streams, rivers, lakes, seas and oceans. Allāh ta‘ālā states:

…and We have sent down pure water from the sky. (25:48)

And We caused the earth to burst with springs… (54:12)

Water – A Medium to Gain Great Reward

Due to its importance and necessity, Allāh ta‘ālā has also promised great reward for those who provide water to the creation of Allāh ta‘ālā. In the above ḥadīth, we already learnt that it attracts the forgiveness of Allāh ta‘ālā. Many other ahādīth also mention further benefits:

• Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has stated, “There is no sadaqah more rewarding than [providing] water.” (Al-Bayhaqī)

• Upon being asked regarding the most virtuous form of sadaqah, Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam replied, “[Providing] water.” (Abū Dāwūd)

• Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam stated, “Whichever Muslim quenches the thirst of another Muslim, Allāh will grant him drink from Ar-Rahīq Al-Makhtūm.” (Abū Dāwūd)

Ar-Rahīq Al-Makhtūm is a special wine of Jannah which has been promised for the special servants – the Abrār (the righteous). Allāh ta‘ālā says,

Verily the Abrār will be in bounties, upon couches looking on. You will recognise the radiance of bounties in their faces. They will be given pure sealed wine to drink, the seal of which is musk. It is for this that the competitors should compete. (83:22-26)

Water – A Means of Continuous Reward

Sadaqah is of two types:

1. Sadaqah: where the reward is confined to the action and the reward is a single entry. For example, when someone feeds another person, a one-off reward is written for him; and

2. As-Sadaqah Al-Jāriyah: when the reward is continuous. In fact, it also continues after one’s demise. For example, authoring a book from which people benefit; for as long as people benefit from this knowledge, the author will continue to reap its reward.

After one’s demise, the avenues to gain further reward by any action inevitably cease. A person finding himself in a bad state in the afterlife cannot carry out any deed to change his situation. Similarly, if he finds himself in a good state and he wishes to enhance his condition further, he is unable to carry out any deed to achieve this. At this juncture, a deceased person has two possibilities of earning reward:

1. Īsāl-uth-Thawāb: someone performing a good deed and sending him its reward; and

2. As-Sadaqah Al-Jāriyah: as explained above, a deed he carried out during his lifetime which is still generating reward for him.

Nabī sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam said,

When a person dies, [reward for] his deeds are cut off from him except three [types]: [reward for] As-Sadaqah Al-Jāriyah, knowledge from which benefit is derived [by others]; and righteous children who pray for him. (Muslim) 

There are many forms of As-Sadaqah Al-Jāriyah a person can carry out. In one narration Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam listed seven and from amongst them he mentioned, “.…a stream which he causes to flow….” (Ibn Mājah)

In another narration we find that Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam also advised providing water as a form of Īsāl-uth-Thawāb. After the demise of his mother, Sayyidunā Sa‘d Ibn ‘Ubādah radhiyallāhu ‘anhu asked Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam which sadaqah would be most meritorious and rewarding. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam replied, “Providing water.” Sayyidunā Sa‘d radhiyallāhu ‘anhu then got a well dug and dedicated its reward for his mother. (Abū Dāwūd)

‘Allāmah Al-‘Aynī rahimahullāh has mentioned a hadīth wherein Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam visited a person who was in his last moments. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam asked him what he was observing [of the next world]. He explained, “I see two angels distancing themselves from me and two snakes coming closer; and I see evil increasing and goodness weakening.” The person sought help from Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam by requesting him to make du‘ā. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam supplicated, “O Allāh! Accept little [he has done] and forgive the large quantity [of evil deeds he has committed].” Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam then asked him what he was seeing now. He replied, “The two angels are coming closer and the two snakes are going away; and I see goodness increasing and evil weakening.” Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam asked him which of his actions he found most rewarding. He said, “Providing water.” (‘Umdah-al-Qārī)

Sayyidunā Anas radhiyallāhu ‘anhu narrates that Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam said, “On the Day of Judgement, the people going to Jannah will be lined up in rows. A person destined for Jahannam [whilst passing by these rows] will come across a person [to whom he had provided water in this worldly life]. He will say to him, ‘Do you remember that day when you asked for water and I gave you water to drink.’ The person will [remember this favour and] intercede for him.” (Ibn Mājah)

Warning on Not Sharing Water

It is the sheer Grace of Allāh ta‘ālā that he has provided this necessity for survival in much abundance and in principle, it is for all people. Therefore, it would be extremely inhuman to deprive someone of water at the time of his need, especially when one has the means to provide it. Consequently, a grave warning has been cited for such wretched people whose hearts do not soften upon seeing others suffering thirst. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has stated:

There are three types of people; Allāh will neither talk to them, nor look towards them, nor purify them, and for them will be a painful punishment: One who has excess water in the path [along a route] and he prevents a traveller [passing by] from [using] it…. (Al-Bukhārī)

Benefit in this World

Providing water not only benefits a person in the hereafter, but it also has worldly benefits. A person once came to ‘Abdullāh ibn Al-Mubārak rahimahullāh complaining about a wound in a knee which was not healing for the past seven years, despite referring to doctors and treating it with various methods of treatment. ‘Abdullāh ibn Al-Mubārak rahimahullāh advised him to find a place where people are in need of water and provide water by digging a well. The person located a place and dug a well and Allāh ta‘ālā cured him. (Al-Bayhaqī)

Imām Al-Bayhaqī rahimahullāh narrates that my teacher Imām Al-Hākim had a wound on his face. Despite many types of treatment, it could not be cured for a period of one year. He requested Abū ‘Uthmān Sābūnī rahimahullāh to make du‘ā for him in his weekly majlis on Friday. Abū ‘Uthmān rahimahullāh made du‘ā for him. The people who attended earnestly beseeched Allāh ta‘ālā saying āmīn to the du‘ā of the shaykh.

The following Friday, a woman who had attended the previous week, sent a note to Imām Abū ‘Uthmān rahimahullāh. In the note she narrated that, after the previous majlis, she went home and earnestly prayed for Imām Al-Hākim rahimahullāh that night. She mentioned that she saw Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam in her dream as if he was advising her to tell Imām Al-Hākim rahimahullāh that he should provide water for the Muslims in abundance. When this note reached Imām Al-Hākim rahimahullāh, he ordered a siqāyah [a place where water is provided] to be constructed outside his home. When the construction was completed, it was filled with sweet water. Ice was also placed in it and people began drinking. Not even a week passed and he was cured and his face turned beautiful again. (Al-Bayhaqī)

Providing Water to Others

It is a great Mercy of Allāh ta‘ālā that we in England do not experience a shortage of water. Clean and abundant water is available at all times. We should be thankful to Allāh ta‘ālā for this great gift. There are so many people throughout the world who have to travel far distances to bring clean water for their homes. The short supply obliges them to get every family member to walk the long distance in order to obtain as much water as possible, including young children.

Those of us who are fortunate to have water in abundance and sufficient wealth, should resolve to provide water to the less fortunate ones according to our means. This could be through:

• arranging for wells to be dug;

• providing water pumps;

• providing water coolers; and

• setting up drinking fountains.

In whatever way possible, we should seek to quench the thirst of people and animals. Providing water to the general public on a hot summer day in this country or elsewhere, will also be a deed that will be greatly recompensed by Allāh ta‘ālā. Along with that, the wider community will be able to appreciate the beautiful teachings of the saviour of humanity, our beloved Nabī sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam, who was sent as mercy for the world.

May Allāh ta‘ālā grant us the ability to engage in this meritorious act as much as possible, in order to secure His Mercy in this life and in the hereafter. Āmīn. 

© Riyādul Jannah (Vol. 26 No. 3, March 2017)


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“I Want My Child To Become a Hafidh of the Qur’an.”

“I Want My Child To Become a Hafidh of the Qur’an.”

“Verily, we revealed the reminder (Qur’an) and we are its guardian.” (15:9)

Narrated ‘Ali bin Abi Talib (Allah be pleased with him): that the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said: “Whoever recites the Qur’an and memorises it, making lawful what it makes lawful, and unlawful what it makes unlawful, Allah will admit him to Paradise due to it, and grant him intercession for ten of his family members who were to be consigned to the Fire.” (Tirmidhi as weak)

Alhumdu Lillah, it is through the sheer grace and mercy of Allah, al-Kareem, we find so many people memorising the Qur’an in the UK. In a small country like England there must be thousands of Huffadh, Ma Sha Allah – Tabarak Allah – Fa Lillahil Hamd. Where I live, in Blackburn, there must be approximately 1,000+ Huffadh (male and female) in the whole town – Alhumdu Lillah. We should not take this lightly, rather, we must thank Allah profusely for this blessing of the Qur’an and secondly the blessing of memorising/hifdh. There are countries in the world that don’t have 100 Huffadh in the whole country, let alone 1,000! Most of these efforts have been in the last ¼ century. If we rewind back 25 years ago, there were very few places that offered Hifdh classes and the class sizes were very small (less than a dozen boys). Back in the 70s and 80s places like Bradford and Dewsbury only had one Hifdh class in the whole town, and there were a handful in Lancashire, as well as one in Bolton.

This is all down to the miracle of the Qur’an and this proves the Qur’an is a miraculous book.

How?

If we were to give these boys and girls who are memorising the Qur’an a book in English, any book of any genre and they were told to memorise it, would they be able to? Just like they learn a page a day from the Qur’an, surely they should be able to learn a page each day from another book. And this should be easier, as it is in their own language! But, we seldom find such children! This in itself is an indication memorising the Quran is not based entirely on the child’s memory. It is upon merit of the Qur’an being a miraculous book. This is a special favour bestowed upon this Ummah as previous nations were not able to memorise their holy scriptures en masse, thus we will not find a person who has memorised the Bible in its entirety, nor the Torah.

“And We have indeed made the Qur’ân easy to understand and remember.” (al-Najm 54:17)

So whoever strives to memorise it and recite it regularly, it will be made easy for him, and whoever turns away from it, will lose it.  “According to reports from the Banu Israil themselves, the ruler of Rome, Anitos Apifonis got every single copy of the Tawrah and burnt it until not a single copy was left. The same happened to the Bible so the original transcriptions became extinct as a result of the attacks of Titus of Rome…” (An approach to the Qur’anic sciences).

 

Nowadays, we have a wholesale of Huffadh and a greater bulk on the production line wanting to become a Hafidh. This all seems good and well on the surface. But, we must remember a Hafidh is a soul chosen by Allah SWT to protect his book, like the verse mentions:

“Verily, we revealed the reminder (Qur’an) and we are its guardian.” (15:9)

Let us bear in mind, becoming a Hafidh is not Fardh Ayn (obligatory on everyone). The Sahabah (Allah be pleased with them) were not all Hafidh, some only knew a few verses or a Surah. Great Imams like the Master of Hadith, Imam Bukhari (Allah have mercy upon him) was not a Hafidh, some of the greatest scholars in later times like the esteemed Allamah Anwar Shah Kashmiri (Allah have mercy upon him), the honourable Shaykh Yunus Saheb (Allah have mercy upon him) were not Hafidh of the Qur’an. If these scholars who had ‘photographic’ memory were not Hafidh of the Qur’an, why do some parents force their children to memorise the Qur’an. Parents need to have a balance with their approach towards Hifdh, otherwise this can have negative consequences later on in life. Becoming a Hafidh has great rewards, no doubt. But if your child is not cut out for it, please do not force them and ‘suffocate’ them to do Hifdh. Consequently, such children may end up completing their Hifdh, but rarely keep up with their revision thereafter and this has severe punishments attached to it. Becoming a Hafidh is part 1, retaining your Qur’an is part 2 – the harder part. Memorising and retention are both as important as each other. It is better your child learns the last ten Surahs voluntarily and remembers them, rather than forcing him/her to memorise the full Qur’an and he/she later forgets it. They will then be committing a major sin.

“The one who turns away from My message, he shall have a straitened life, and We shall raise him blind on the Day of Judgement.” (Surah Tahaa)

The purpose of this article is not to be negative and put parents off making their children a Hafidh. It is just an eye opener and a gentle reminder. We frequently hear the virtues of a Hafidh, but rarely get to hear the other side which are the warnings of forgetting the Qur’an. For now, let us remember:

  • not every child HAS to become a Hafidh
  • the virtues of a Hafidh are great, but the warning for those who forget the Qur’an are also severe
  • becoming a Hafidh does not guarantee you Jannah, you must act upon the Qur’an and carry out other obligations such as Salah, Fasting, keeping a beard, Akhlaq etc
  • memorising the Qur’an isn’t a medal, which you complete and wear around your neck. It has implications. We must repeat and revise the Qur’an until our death
  • a Hafidh isn’t like someone who has obtained a degree or achieved a certificate and has no further obligations. The Hafidh has a duty thereafter to i) behave like a Hafidh according to the Sunnah ii) try and understand the Qur’an, especially what is Halal and Haram

Narrated Samurah bin Jundab (Allah be pleased with him): The Prophet (ﷺ) said in his narration of a dream that he saw, “He whose head was being crushed with a stone was one who learnt the Qur’an but never acted on it, and slept ignoring the compulsory prayers.” (Bukhari)

My aim is to create a balance, that alongside all the virtues of Tahfeedh/Hifdh, there are also the punishments for forgetting the Qur’an. Which doesn’t necessarily mean the ‘whole’ Qur’an, it can be a Surah or even just a verse. Many people learn Surah Yaseen or the whole Amma para in childhood, then later in life tend to forget it.

From Anas bin Malik (Allah be pleased with him): that the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said: “The rewards for my Ummah were displayed before me, even (the reward for) the dust that a man comes out of the Masjid with. The sins of my Ummah were displayed before me, and I have not seen a sin worse than a Surah or Ayah of the Qur’an which a man learned and then forgot.”  (Tirmidhi)

 

“And We have indeed made the Qur’ân easy to understand and remember.” (al-Najm 54:17)

So whoever strives to memorise it and recite it regularly, it will be made easy for him, and whoever turns away from it, will lose it.

Imam Ibn ul-Munadi (may Allah have mercy on him) said in Mutashabih al-Qur’an (p. 52): “The Salaf were always afraid of forgetting Qur’an after they had memorised it, because this was a shortcoming.”

Imam Suyooti (may Allah have mercy on him) said in al-Itqaan (1/106): Forgetting it is a major sin.” As was stated by Imam Nawawi (may Allah have mercy on him) in al-Rawdah and others, because of the Hadith “I was shown the sins of my Ummah…”

For the family (who have a child/ren memorising Qur’an), a Hifdh family needs to prioritise and they need to see the light at the end of the tunnel. They need to realise that memorising the Qur’an isn’t an honour bestowed on just anyone. When one commits to this, they need to put their heart and soul and mind into it, and everything else is secondary! Yes, you’re the type of parents, if the Oxford Dictionary had a definition for you, it would read thus,

Hifdh parent
/hɪfdh parent/

noun.
“a mum or dad whose social, emotional, physical and psychological decisions are governed by what Para their children are memorising”

Every Muslim parent wants success for their child- in this world and the next and to keep them focused on the Straight Path. One of the surest ways to raise one’s child firmly on the Deen, is to create a connection with the Qur’an – the book of Allah – which has been explicitly sent down as a guidance for mankind. For this connection to take place, one needs to create an affinity for this book to inspire feelings of attachment. Understanding the Qur’an, and exploring its depth will all come later, but as long as parents are able to create an association between the child and the Qur’an, the most important job of all is done.

Some tips for parents In Sha Allah:

  1. First and foremost see if your child has the ability to memorise the Qur’an by testing his current Surahs and Duas etc. And your intention should be correct for making him/her Hafidh; to please Allah SWT and inculcate love for the Qur’an in the child. We hear parents talking about ‘free tickets to Jannah because my son is a Hafidh.’ It’s like the poor child is burdening the sins of the whole family… and if he doesn’t complete Hifdh we are doomed for Hell. La Hawla Wa La Quwata Illa Billah.
  2. Inculcate the love of the Qur’an into your children by giving them Qur’an CDs or buying them a Qur’an cube, play short Surahs as they are easier to memorise. Play these daily in the morning or at night, whilst in the car or even on YouTube at home.
  3. Start early –“learning when young is like engraving on stone.” From the time your children are small (or even when your baby is in the womb), recite the Qur’an to them in a beautiful voice. Let the sound of your Qira’ah be one that creates an instant memory of the love that they have for him. What would be even better is to recite the Quran after Fajr, so that when your child opens his/her eyes in the morning, the very first sound he/she hears is that of the Words of Allah.
  4. Set goals and rewards. Treat him/her with positive reinforcements like a snack bar or chocolate or playtime outside, when they complete a Surah/Para. Constantly remind them of the reward and that their efforts are not being wasted. As your child becomes better at reciting the Quran, encourage him to memorise portions of the text such as the short Surahs, and some importance ones like Surah Yaseen, Surah Al-Mulk and so on. Tell them the importance of these various Surahs as well so that the child adds to his bond with the Quran.
  5. Set a timetable at home, working with school time and school work. As well as Madrasah time and Madrasah lessons. Keep two small sessions rather than one long one. E.g. after Fajr and after school.
  6. If you like, you can create a healthy competition between your children. Do not “compare” your children though, because each child is unique. What is best is to set different goals for each depending on their capabilities and see who reaches their goal first.
  7. Model What You Want Your Children to Emulate: Children learn most from their parents actions than their commands. Engage yourself with the Qur’an, try to memorise parts of it yourself and you will notice that your children will take more interest in picking up the Quran themselves. Actions speak louder than word.
  8. Provide the right environment. It is hard for the Qur’an to exist in the heart when the mind is occupied with music, televisions, cartoons etc. It is the job of the parent to create an environment conducive to learning the Qur’an by keeping their children away from negative influences, and providing them the opportunity to go regularly to the Masjid, meeting good Muslims and pious people and attending gatherings where they can learn about the Deen. A hifdh family is different than a normal family!They should have a secluded place to go to and memorise that is quiet. You just can’t memorise properly with distractions, so turn off all your devices (like mobile phones)
  9. To pace is better than to race. Some children can learn three pages every day. Others struggle with three lines. Every child is different. Pace your child according to his level. Do not put a timeline on when the hifdh needs to finish. Even if it is a lifelong task, remember quality is better than quantity. Let your children learn with love in their hearts rather than stress.
  10. Last but not least, be patient and do not get angry when your children make mistakes. Every child is different, and you must not create despondency in them by becoming exasperated. Try and sit with them to help them learn, encourage and give a mother and father’s support. Make Dua to Allah SWT to help you children and to keep them on the path of learning throughout their lives. Pray Tahajjud and give Sadaqah on behalf of them. The Prophet (ﷺ) said: “Three supplications are answered, there being no doubt about them; that of a father (for his children), that of a traveller and that of one who has been wronged.” (Abu Dawud)

NB: One addition, particularly for mothers is to feed your child some memory boosting food, such as raw honey, Zamzam water, olive oil, dates and almonds. More of these can be found here . Please avoid unhealthy food or anything that has a lack of vitamins and minerals, contains high cholesterol, white sugar, carbonated beverages, processed carbohydrates and over eating in general. Children should get sufficient sleep and a good amount of exercise. Exercise causes more oxygen to transfer to your brain. A lack of exercise leads to laziness, weight gain, and internal health issues, and will thus affect memorisation and other mental faculties.

The second issue is that of a teacher, finding a “good teacher”. The Qur’an cannot be learnt without a teacher. Even the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) learnt from angel Jibreel AS. Similarly, Allah’s Messenger (ﷺ) taught the Qur’an and listened to it from his Companions (Allah be pleased with them). A good teacher will not only correct one’s recitation but also teach the correct Tajweed and pronunciation.

From my own experience of teaching children who have left other Madrasahs or Maktabs that run from home, there seems to be a lot of emphasis on sabaq i.e. the new lesson. Little or no emphasis is being put on their revision i.e. dawr. Alongside that issue of some classes being full to the brim. I strongly believe that having 15-20 students in a Hifdh class is far too much, especially when the allocated time is typically two to two and a half hours per day. Having this high number of children in one class in that amount of time is extremely unfair on them as they do not receive the full desired and needed attention.  This then leads me on to the extortionate fees at such places.  So, we have this short amount of time for the high number of children receiving minimum attention at £10 to £15 per week. Anyone can do the maths and see that Madrasahs unfortunately, are turning into a business. Teachers are too focused on ‘quantity’, rather than ‘quality’, there is ample proof of this.

“The best among you (Muslims) are those who learn the Qur’an and teach it.” (Sahih Bukhari)

Tips for teachers In Sha Allah:

  1. Having a pure intention: Whether it is memorising the Qur’an or doing anything else for the sake of Allah SWT, the single most important thing needed for the success of that goal is to have the right intention. One must secure one’s intention purely for the sake of Allah SWT, for even if the person does not achieve success in this world, his success is guaranteed in the hereafter. Do not make your Madrasah/Class a money making business. Remind your students as well to have a firm intention for Allah SWT.
  2. “And recite the Qur’an (aloud) in a slow, (pleasant tone and) style.”(73:4)

Ali (Allah be pleased with him) commented on this verse saying, “Tarteel is Tajweed of the letters and recognising the places of Waqf (stopping). Before teaching the children Hifdh, please ensure their Tajweed is rectified and their pronunciation is correct.

3. Don’t have an age limit for your class, as there is no real age when to start Hifdh and it is never too late – In Sha Allah. Some teachers do recommend age 7, others recommend 11. My personal opinion, some children are seen to mature before others. Sometimes children of the same age are worlds apart in their understanding and receptiveness. Sometimes a child who is brilliant in school might have a harder time with the Qur’an. Judge your student for who is he is before embarking him on the journey to learn the Qur’an.

4. Ensure your students have a specific copy of the Qur’an from which he/she reads all the time. A visual image of the page leaves an imprint in the mind, making it easier to recall later.

5. Encourage students to read melodiously and beautify their recitation as much as they can. It is pleasing to one’s ears, provides an incentive to continue with the memorisation.  It helps make one’s memorisation firm and strong because any mistake will ‘sound’ incorrect as it will distort the harmony of the rhythm one is used to. A Miswak is instrumental in this, it cleans the teeth but also clears the throat. Ali (Allah be pleased with him) said: “Verily, your mouths are the pathways of the Qur’an, therefore cleanse your mouth with the Miswak thoroughly.” (Ibn Majah)

6. Keep rewards charts/stickers for the children, praise them regularly for their good efforts. Gently correcting them when they falter. Avoid negativity. Never use a loud voice, harsh words or insults when it comes to instructing or motivating your students.

7. “And if an evil suggestion comes to you from Satan, then seek refuge in Allah . Indeed, He is Hearing and Knowing.” [ 7: 200] Shaytan will always try and stop this meritorious deed. Remind your students of the virtues of the Qur’an which can be found here

8. The Ustadh should always remain in a state of Wudhu, reminding the children to keep their Wudhu too as long as possible. Encourage them with these Hadith. “Truly, Allah loves those who turn unto Him in repentance and loves those who purify themselves (by taking a bath and cleaning and washing thoroughly their private parts, bodies, for their prayers, etc.).” [2: 222] The Prophet (ﷺ) used to remain in a state of cleanliness and Wudhu. This is one of the best ways to keep Shaytan from influencing us and whispering evil thoughts. Allah SWT loves those who keep themselves clean and it is only His love and protection that can help us defeat our greatest enemy.

9. I was reading online that a particular Ustadh in another country whose Hifdh class students were known to be the best in the town. Why? Every month he would gather the students one night and make them lead in Tahajjud, they would read their Qur’an what they had memorised that month. This might be hard, but not impossible! If not for Tahajjud, maybe one weekend in the daytime make them lead in Nafl Salah. This will boost their confidence and also train them for Taraweeh, which is the litmus test for every Hafidh.

10. And finally, the last point but probably the most important, there is absolutely no excuse or justification for physical beating or abuse when it comes to teaching. This was never seen in the life of the Prophet (ﷺ) nor the illustrious companions (Allah be pleased with them). I know of many adults who either left Islam or abandoned the Qur’an at an older age because of the harshness that was associated with it at a younger age, due to culture and not religion.

NB: Teach the students Adab/etiquettes. How to hold the Qur’an with respect, not to make drawings in their Qur’an and always carry the Qur’an in their right hand. It is very sad to see, more often than not, children walking home with their Qur’ans in their left hands, which is such a basic etiquette generally forgotten by Ustadhs to teach them.

I will conclude with some advice for those who are either fully Hafidh or have memorised a portion of the Qur’an but are struggling to revise and refresh it.

It was narrated that ‘Abdullah (Allah be pleased with him) said: the Prophet (ﷺ) said: “It is not right for any one of you to say, ‘I have forgotten such and such.’ On the contrary, he has been made to forget. Try to review the Qur’an, for it is more likely to escape from men’s hearts than camels (let loose).” (Bukhari, 5032).

I read these lines of poetry written by Imam Shafi’ee (Allah be pleased with him) when he complained to his teacher about a weak memory and they have stayed with me since:

I complained to Wakee‘ RH about my poor memory:
Give up your sins, was his advice to me;
For knowledge is a light from divinity,
And the Light of God is veiled by iniquity.

IMG_0430

If one strives hard to review the Qur’an regularly, there will be no sin on him even if he does forget some of it, for Allah sees the effort. The blame is on those who neglect the Qur’an and fail to review it and read it regularly.

Let’s put it this way: the blessings of memorising the words of Allah and the barakah it brings to the life of a Muslim cannot be beaten! My advice would be to memorise as much as you can even if it is an Ayah and review it every day, for the Qur’an will be a great companion to have in the grave and on the Day of Judgement.

Allah knows best.

Ismail ibn Nazir Satia (One who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure).

1 Muharram 1439

Spending to Success

By Hadhrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam said:

Sadaqah does not decrease wealth. (Muslim)

We learn from this hadīth that no one will ever suffer financial loss due to spending in the path of Allāh ta’ālā. This principle is absolute. Financial experts and economists may not agree, but the words of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam can never be wrong. The intellect says that spending, whether in sadaqah or for worldly matters, decreases one’s wealth. It calculates that someone with £1,000 who spends £100 on helping an orphan or widow, or on building a masjid, will be left with £900, so spending decreases wealth. However, sadaqah does not decrease wealth, and the thought that it does comes from Shaytān, and is in direct contradiction to the teachings of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.

Shaytān’s Promise

This ploy of Shaytān has been described in the Qur’ān:

Shaytān promises you poverty, and commands you to indecency… (2:268)

When dealing with people who are not particularly religious, Shaytān scares them with the threat of poverty and tries to persuade them not to spend in the path of Allāh ta’ālā at all. The approach he takes with religious people is to persuade them to spend only what is obligatory, arguing that anything beyond that would lead to poverty. He asserts that zakāh, which is fard, is already a drain on resources, so giving voluntary sadaqah will only incur a further decrease in wealth. Furthermore, he reminds them of their other religious financial obligations, like spending on their families etc. in an attempt to discourage them from spending voluntarily in the path of Allāh ta’ālā.

Shaytān will exert his energies to stop a person spending a mere £5 towards the construction of a masjid, scaring him with thoughts of poverty, yet he will allow the same individual to happily squander £50 in the marketplace, as he has no interest in preventing him from doing so. He stops believers spending in ways that bring the pleasure of Allāh ta’ālā, and encourages them to indulge in isrāf – being extravagant and wasteful with money – as it brings the displeasure of Allāh ta’ālā.

It is therefore essential that we do muhāsabah (self assessment) at every step in case our approach to spending is actually lowering our value in the eyes of Allāh ta’ālā, curbing our spiritual and religious progress and pleasing Shaytān.

Allāh ta’ālā’s Promise

…And Allāh promises you forgiveness from Himself and Abundance; and Allāh is All-Embracing, All-Knowing. (2:268)

While Shaytān promises only one thing, poverty, Allāh ta’ālā promises two: forgiveness and an increase in wealth. The first of these is a blessing that secures success in the hereafter, and the second brings ease in the world.

If £1 is spent in the path of Allāh ta’ālā, the minimum He will give in return to the giver is £10, a tenfold increase. Thereafter, Allāh ta’ālā increases the return by whatever multiple he wishes, up to seven hundred times and beyond, depending on the level of sincerity with which sadaqah is given and the difficulties borne by the giver. Someone who only has £100 and gives £1 makes a bigger sacrifice than someone who has £1,000 and spends £1; if the latter is rewarded tenfold with £10, the former will be rewarded with even more.

The Return on Sadaqah

In fact, Allāh ta’ālā has appointed an angel who supplicates night and day:

O Allāh, bestow a [good] return on the spender. (Al-Bukhārī)

The manner in which Allāh ta’ālā, through His wisdom, gives this return can take a number of forms:

1) Allāh ta’ālā rewards the giver with an actual increase in wealth, either straight away or after some time.

2) When someone who is well-off spends in sadaqah, Allāh ta’ālā may not give the return to him, but instead He may give it to a needy member of his offspring in the future.

3) By giving sadaqah Allāh ta’ālā protects the giver’s remaining wealth from future loss, and this is a return in itself. For example, a person was going to suffer a loss of £1,000, but by giving £200 sadaqah he is protected from that loss. He has, in effect, been given £800.

Become a Skilled Spender

Moreover, Allāh ta’ālā will reward the person in the hereafter too and will multiply his reward according to the same principles mentioned above, i.e. if a person spends £1 , Allāh ta’ālā will reward him for spending at least £10, and thereafter more according the level of sincerity and sacrifice.

Allāh ta’ālā uses a beautiful example to illustrate how He multiplies the reward for spending in His path:

The example of those who spend in the way of Allāh is just like a grain that produced seven ears, each ear having a hundred grains; and Allāh multiplies [the reward further] for whom He wills. Allāh is All-Embracing, All-Knowing. (2:261)

Allāh ta’ālā compares the reward of spending in His path to planting a single grain, which produces a plant bearing seven hundred grains. Allāh ta’ālā repays a person who spends with sincerity in His path and patiently bears any difficulties involved, by giving a reward in the hereafter equal to having spent seven hundred times the amount that was actually spent. Further, at a time of His choosing He rewards the giver with seven hundred times the original amount in this very world. And that is not all: Allāh ta’ālā gives even more when He wills.

Allāh ta’ālā’s use of a similitude in this verse, instead of just saying that He will give a seven-hundred-fold reward, provides us with a number of important lessons related to spending in the path of Allāh ta’ālā:

1) A seed will only germinate and grow if the ground it is sown in is fertile. Similarly, sadaqah will only produce reward and an increase in wealth if it is spent on a proper and deserving cause.

2) The seed must not be rotten but must be healthy and sound. Similarly, the wealth given in sadaqah must not be harām, but must have been acquired by halāl means.

3) The person sowing the seed must be proficient in planting. He must know how to plough the ground, how deep to sow the seed, how to water it etc. Similarly, the person giving sadaqah must be proficient in the masā’il related to spending.

So sadaqah will only produce a seven-hundred-fold harvest when the ‘ground’ and the ‘seed’ are sound and the giver is a competent ‘farmer’. And it is only then that sadaqah will be a true investment for the future.

May Allāh ta’ālā grant us all the ability to spend in His path and earn the vast rewards He has promised in both worlds. Āmīn.

© Riyādul Jannah (Vol. 18 No. 5, May 2009)

Burma: Where Were the Muslims?

By Khalid Baig
Just imagine the year is 2100 CE, long after we are all dead. A school child is studying Muslim history of the last century. He finds extremely disturbing events that took place at the beginning of that century. More than a million people were persecuted with murders, expulsions from homes, and dishonoring of Muslim women. The most disturbing fact is that it was not that Muslim armies fought and lost; these were simply one-sided battles with armies of murderers, rapists, and thugs victimizing innocent and helpless people.
Where were the Muslims, he wonders. He finds that despite a successful effort by their adversaries to reduce their numbers through birth control, there were still 1.2 billion of them in the world. They were on all continents, in all countries. More than 50 countries in the world had majority Muslim populations and Muslim rulers. Did they have no armies or weapons? Actually, they had big armies and lot of weapons. One country was even a nuclear power and had successfully developed ballistic missiles that could hit faraway targets. Another Muslim country with a big army was just next to the troubled area. Some of the countries were very rich. Together, they had sufficient resources to stop the atrocities.
Maybe they did not get the news of the tragic events in time. Actually, they did have good communication equipment. Although they did not really control that equipment and those controlling it used to color and distort things a lot, yet Muslims everywhere were able to hear and see the horrors faced by their fellow brothers and sisters as they were taking place. They saw their plight, they heard their cries, but not a soldier moved from the Muslim world to help those whose lives, honors, and properties were being trampled simply because they were Muslims.

Maybe they had become totally indifferent to the plight of their fellows. Maybe they had lost their faith— no, lost their soul — so they just did not care. Actually, despite all their problems, individual Muslims all over the world were still deeply concerned about their fellows. They talked about them. They raised money for them. They prayed for them. They desperately petitioned whoever they thought could help.
Then what was happening? The student is perplexed. As he continues to dig through historical accounts, he finds something curious. As the massacres were continuing in Burma, a big army assembled by Saudi Arabia was busy attacking Muslims in Yemen.
Their enemies had certainly done their part in igniting the flames of those internecine wars, but they had tried that throughout history. The intriguing development that facilitated this fiasco was a strange new ideology that had gripped the Muslim world. The devastating ideology was that of the nation-state. According to it each Muslim country was an independent nation. And so they became. Each with its own national flag, national anthem, national days, and national interests. As Muslim governments took legitimacy from the concept of nation-state, they owed their allegiance to it also — when they did not owe their allegiance to their foreign masters. In the halls of power, the ummah died. Muslim leaders did talk about the ummah but only as a remote, ceremonial entity. The governments and armies were there to protect the national boundaries and national interests; nobody looked after the boundaries or interests of the ummah.
The murders, arsons, and dishonoring of women in Kashmir was not the concern of anyone except Pakistan and that only because the area was a strategic source of Pakistan’s water. If it were not for the “national interests,” Pakistan would have nothing to do with them either. The brutalization of Muslims in Palestine was not the concern of anyone except the Palestinians themselves. Even Jerusalem and Al-Aqsa had become Palestinian problems. Burma was responsibility of no one, because it did not exist at all on the new maps of national interests.

It was a bizarre ideology, exported by the colonial powers so their hold would remain strong even after they had formally given up the colonies. But in those strange days people normally had one of two reactions to most anything that came from their former colonial masters; they either welcomed it, thinking it would bring them progress and happiness, or they became resigned to it thinking it inevitable. However, the ideology of nation-states was exactly opposed to the Islamic idea of one ummah and life was torn between the conflicting concepts. Hajj symbolized the dichotomy. It was the annual reminder that Muslims are one people, as believers from all over the world wore the same two-sheet dress, circumbulated the same Ka’ba, making the same commitment “O Allah I am here”. It had also been turned into a reminder of the most important belonging of a pilgrim: his passport. Without that certificate of belonging to a nation-state no one could perform Hajj or even move from one point to another in the sacred land.
The student finally understands the ideological trap that guaranteed the tragedies of Burma and Bosnia and Kosova and Iraq and Afghanistan and … and… an endless list. But he cannot figure out why did Muslims of the period allow themselves to be so trapped. Did they not remember the Qur’anic declaration, “The Believers are but a Single Brotherhood.” [AlHujarat, 49:10]. Did they not remember the Qur’anic command, “Hold fast together the Rope that Allah has extended for you and do not dispute among yourselves.” [Aale-Imran, 3:103]. Did they not remember the hadith, “Muslims are one body. If any part of the body is suffering the whole body feels the pain.” Did they not know that the devastating idea of nation-states was actually the idea of creating permanent divisions in the ummah?  What was going through their minds? Why did they allow themselves to be imprisoned in the cage of that stinking nationalism?
He gives up. History is so full of intrigues!
Post Script:
People have been asking why Pakistan is indifferent to the plight of Burma’s persecuted Muslims plight.
This is the wrong question to ask. For Pakistan is not indifferent. It has extended its hand of support —- to, yes, the Burmese government. 
“The governments of Pakistan and Myanmar are now in “advanced negotiations” to licence-build the JF-17, a single-engine multi-role fighter jet, IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly, an independent defence news agency, reported.”
What is more, they are quite proud of this achievement.
“According to PAC chairman Air Marshal Javaid Ahmed, the first sale of Pakistan-made jets to a foreign nation has been a “milestone in the country’s aviation history.”

Of course this was nearly two years after the report that showed strong evidence of genocide of Burma’s Muslim by its government.

(In 1999 I wrote Kosova: Where were the Muslims. Nearly two decades later it is the same story. This article is an adaptation of the earlier article).

When is Eid?

ras malai
We can truly celebrate Eid…
When Muslims will unite,
They will no longer bicker and no longer fight.
When Palestine (and all Muslim lands) will be liberated,
And Muslims will no longer be incarcerated.
When the recipients of Zakah will no longer be eligible,
Because people in power will be fair and responsible,
When youth will repent and do sincere Tawbah,
We won’t see them drunk and intoxicated, just see them sensible and sober. 
When injustice and lies will be extinct and dead,
Fairness and truth will be widely spread. 
We can truly celebrate Eid when we have pleased Allah,
And entered that first step in Jannah…in alFirdaws al-A’laa!
Ismail ibn Nazir Satia (One who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure).
10th Dhul Hijjah 1438

20 Years On. . .

1st July 1961 – 31st August 1997 – Princess Diana RH

http://blackbag.gawker.com/who-killed-princess-diana-1692645313

What would Princess Diana be doing if she were alive today? Would she be on a reality show? Would she wear peplums? Would she have solved global hunger? Admittedly I think about this more often than I should, because so much potential, so much intrigue, so much gossip was lost when Lady Di, the Queen of Peoples’ Hearts and One-Piece Bathing Suits and Foofy Blond Short Haircuts and Being a Humanitarian but Not in a Weird, Scary Self-Righteous Way Like Angelina Jolie, died. Or rather: was murdered.

Let’s first nail down our facts. Diana, Princess of Wales, died at age 36 in a car crash in the Pont de l’Alma tunnel in Paris on the night of August 31, 1997. The driver of the car, a Frenchman named Henri Paul, was drunk and driving erratically to outfox a gaggle of paparazzi who were in pursuit of the vehicle. Paul was also killed in the crash, as was Diana’s boyfriend, Dodi Fayed. Her bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones, was injured.

Seems fairly open and shut. High speeds, intoxicated driver, a dark tunnel, a car crash. Paris in the ’90s. But wait. Why would Diana and her incredibly wealthy boyfriend get into a Mercedes with an extraordinarily drunken driver? Paul’s blood alcohol level was three times the French legal limit. The paparazzi chasing them down at high speeds—what is this, a Bond film? Why weren’t Diana and Dodi wearing seat belts? Were the seat belts compromised? What about those cars that fled the scene, never to be heard from again? And why was Diana’s body embalmed so quickly? Was it to hide the fact that she was… pregnant with Dodi Fayed’s baby??? All signs pointed to something sinister.

And by “something sinister,” I mean the Royal Family, because if anyone was out to get Diana, it was them. She had been a thorn in their side for years—”skimpily educated,” as one journalist put it politely, media-hungry (usually in a way that made her look good and them bad), and at the center of an embarrassing divorce, after 15 years of marriage, from Prince Charles, who married Diana despite his everlasting love for his ex-girlfriend, Camilla Parker-Bowles. But regardless of the Royals’ pursed lips when it came to Diana, she was forever theirs as the mother of William Windsor, who would one day be king, and little Harry, who was probably not biologically the son of Charles but that’s another post for another time.

There are two competing theories as to why the Royals would have wanted Diana dead. The first has to do with Dodi Fayed, the very rich man that Diana had just started dating before they were united in eternal hellfire. The son of Egyptian billionaire Mohammed Al-Fayed, who owned the English department store Harrods, Dodi worked as a film producer (Hook) but seemed mostly to party and spend his father’s money. So it’s weird that the Royals allegedly had a problem with him, because that’s basically their modus operandi, but they did. Can you guess why?

If you answered “because he was a Muslim” you are right! Rumors abounded that the romance between Diana and Dodi was heating up at a very fast clip—and that Diana was pregnant with Dodi’s baby and the couple was planning to get engaged. Conspiracy theorists suggest that the Royal Family would simply crumble like a teacake at the inclusion of an Egyptian Muslim (or more tactfully put, a non-Christian) into their fold, and would rather murder the expectant couple and their unborn child in cold blood (but make it look like an accident, you know, for appearances).

The other theory involves Prince Charles, our George W. Bush of the East. Charles did not come out looking good from the Diana divorce, not only because he is an exceptionally ugly man, but because of very dirty and weird phone conversations between him and Camilla Parker Bowles that were leaked to the British press (for the uneducated, Charles told Camilla that he wanted to be her tampon).

Anyway, everyone knew all along that Charles had been in love with Camilla and would probably marry her when Diana was out of the picture. But that was the problem: Even though they had divorced, Diana wasn’t getting out of the picture. Their divorce had made her more popular than ever. She was still the Queen of Peoples’ Hearts. She was giving extraordinary interviews to television journalists. She was bringing the world closer to peace by eradicating land mines in Africa. And her divorce made her all the more relatable. Now she was a single mother! To the perpetual annoyance of the Royals, she was the most popular person in their family, and she was barely in their family. Charles wanted to move on, to install a new princess in his life (or a duchess, as Camilla eventually became, when they married 2005). But no matter what, Camilla would be despised in Diana’s shadow.

So, according to conspiracy theorists, the choice was clear. Disposing of Diana would be a complicated task for the Royals, made a bit easier by the state services at their beck and call, including the MI6, or the CIA of Britain. She was, after all, a threat to the sanctity of the Royal family, so why not use the secret state intelligence service to rid the country of her? It was an almost patriotic undertaking.

As the theory goes, besides the engagement of willful drunk Henri Paul and a thrum of unruly paparazzi, there were several “mystery cars” involved in the crash, some of which were never found. Evidence suggests these cars were Diana’s true undoing: one of them, a white Fiat Uno, made contact with Paul’s Mercedes before it crashed in the tunnel that fateful night, evidently pushing it toward its demise. Were these cars tools of the MI6? French police zeroed in on the driver of the Fiat Uno in 1998; he committed suicide in 2000. His body was found in a burnt-out BMW in the French countryside, a gunshot wound to his head.

The search for answers in Diana’s death is not a fruitful one. You can accept the answer that it was simply an accident. Or you can think like a Royal: Diana was the most beloved woman in the world at the time of her death. She would only become more powerful with Dodi Fayed’s money and child, both of which would stain the fabric of the Windsor tapestry. How could anyone move on with their lives? The health of the Royal Family, the country’s ballast, stretching back hundreds of years through numerous global catastrophes, had to be considered. What was the most sensible option?

Perhaps it was a drunk driver, the paparazzi, and a dark tunnel in Paris on a late summer’s night.

http://www.islamicparty.com/commonsense/diana22.htm

Diana: Death of a Princess

Whilst the elaborate funeral arrangements calmed the unprecedented public response to Princess Diana’s sudden death – a mixture of shock, sense of loss and rage at the establishment – they also ensured that the actual happenings on that late evening in Paris were not discussed further. Many ordinary people in Britain openly question the tragic accident version, but only the foreign media dared to make mention of other possibilities. Other European media reported conspiracy theories floating about the internet and dismissed them as irrelevant. Non-European media in many cases talked openly of a plot to get rid of the princess who had become an embarrassment. Whilst proof is hard to come by, with witnesses taken care of by the highest authorities, too many pieces of information do not add up, and it is certainly not difficult to detect a motive. It must certainly have been a most unhappy time for the Royal Family and the British establishment to hear of Diana’s intention to seriously get involved with an Arab, whose father had not long ago been denied British citizenship. That she gifted Dodi al-Fayed her late father’s cuff links should indicate that the relationship meant more to Diana than a temporary acquaintance. One could hardly imagine the heirs to the throne, princes William and Harry looking up to and possibly living with a, at least nominally, Muslim step-father.

The scenario had arisen once before, when Princess Diana had not yet been divorced, but had a friendship with a Pakistani heart surgeon, Hasnat Khan. The Muslim News revealed that based on that relationship a novel had been written by an ex-SAS man, Barry Davies, telling the story of how right-wing extremists were plotting to kill Diana for bringing the country into disrepute by marrying a Muslim, who in the book Royal Blood is named as a Dr. Khan. The book was due to be published by Virgin later this year, but has now been withdrawn. A further motive was provided by her upsetting many powerful people with her campaign against land-mines, and it is said that she was going to turn attention next to the plight of Iraqi children dying by the thousands due to UN-sanctions.

The unanswered questions remain: Why were security arrangements changed on very short notice with the princess and her lover departing in a single limousine instead of being accorded the usual protection with three cars. Did the recent repairs to the car’s steering wheel, after alleged vandalism, have anything to do with it getting out of control. In the early stages there were reports of the speedometer being stuck at a certain high speed, those reports were later retracted. People near the tunnel heard a loud, explosion-like sound. Photographers who tried to assist the princess were stopped from doing so by police. Photographers who arrived late at the scene were still arrested, maybe to make sure that they wouldn’t divulge what they had witnessed. As there were allegedly so many photographers, there must be ample film footage of what really happened. None of the material has ever been released, and no release of material has been demanded, probably due to the hyped outrage against photographers who were made the scape-goat. According to some French papers there was another car travelling in front of the Mercedes trying to force it to brake just before it entered the tunnel. There were later reports that parts of another car that might have collided with the Mercedes were found at the crash site. None of these facts re-surfaced after they were first mentioned. Experts from Mercedes Benz had offered after the accident to assist with the crash analysis. There offer was rejected by French authorities.

Then there is the question of what happened to Diana after the accident, as apparently she sat on the floor of the car talking to a photographer, and she remained conscious during the two hours it took to cut her out of the wreckage, yet she was said to have suffered such severe injuries that necessitated the ambulance to drive so slowly that the 7-mile journey lasted a whole hour. However, when arriving at the hospital, her condition was not listed as critical. The condition was only recorded as critical four hours after the crash, and within ten minutes from then she is said to have died. The course of death given was cardiac tamponade, which means that there was severe pressure due to excess fluid in the vicinity of the heart, allegedly from a ruptured vein in the left lung, but this condition would not have permitted her to stay alive for four hours. Nor was she put onto a heart-lung machine during that time. Her body guard eventually survived, but cannot remember anything. It is quite likely that he would not survive the recovery of his memory at a later time. Seeing that the full facts around the death of J. F. Kennedy are still speculation and the cover-up continues, we shall have to wait for a long time to get answers to those questions.

The film made by Mohammed al-Fayed, (father of Dodi al-Fayed and owner of Ritz hotel).

http://www.express.co.uk/expressyourself/245889/Keith-Allen-Princess-Diana-cover-up-and-why-you-won-t-see-my-film

Did Diana accept Islam before she died?

There are several Muslim scholars who confirm this and someone actually had a dream shortly after she passed away:

“One night, out of the blue I saw Diana (Allah have mercy on her) in my dream. She was very happy, peaceful, content and smiling. She was wearing a light blue outfit and the background was white buildings, pure white, beautiful designs. The ground was white and the building was white.”

Although dreams are not proof per se, but glad tidings can certainly be given in dreams. Alhumdu Lillah!

 

~ It was just a few words!

wordsPonder over the following examples where very few words unlocked the greatness of three great people.
= The first:
Imam Ishaq Ibn Rahawayh RH once said during a study circle of Hadith,
“من ينشط منكم لجمع الصحيح؟”
“Whom here is willing to take it upon himself to compile for us the authentic Hadith?”
Imam Al-Bukhari RH was present and said, “His words fell onto my heart”
Imagine that! It was just those words which sparked off the most beneficial Hadith project in History!
= The second:
Imam Ash-Shafi’i RH was most interested in poetry in the earlier parts of his life. One scholar heard him speak poetry and so he asked him, “أين أنت من الفِقه؟”
“Why don’t you focus on the study of Fiqh (jurisprudence) instead?”
This had a profound effect on Imam Ash-Shafi’i RH and because of these words, he completely changed the course of his study and turned to the study of Hadith and Fiqh till he became an Imam. All of this was because of one simple encounter with a wise well-wisher.
= The third:
Have you heard of Imam Adh-Dhahabi RH? His handwriting was once spotted by Imam Al-Barzali RH so he said to Adh-Dhahabi RH, “إنَّ خطك هذا يشبه خط المُحدِّثين”
“Your handwriting resembles the handwriting of the scholars of Hadith”
Imam Adh-Dhahabi RH said,
فحبَّب الله لي علم الحديث
“After hearing that, Allah placed the love of Hadith in my heart!”
You have no idea of the potential influence which your words may have on your children, students, family members or friends, even if your words are few!
 Coupled with your sincerity and wisely tailored words of encouragement, plant the seed of inspiration within their hearts and leave it to grow. This person may develop to become the next scholar, a ground-breaking caller to Islam, the mother of the next revivalist or the founder of a revolutionary project for the Ummah.
You may end up forgetting all about this seed.wrds
But this reformed individual will never forget. More importantly, Allah will never forget.
Anonymous
1st Dhul Hijah 1438power in words.jpg